Eat Train Prosper

Training Cycle Chat + Rear Delts | ETP#47

December 07, 2021 Aaron Straker | Bryan Boorstein
Eat Train Prosper
Training Cycle Chat + Rear Delts | ETP#47
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

This week Bryan and Aaron cover the complete design of Bryan's new hypertrophy training rotation now that his strength cycle has officially ended. How you can determine your sensitivity when supplementing with Melatonin, and current favorite movement patterns to train the rear delts for hypertrophy. As always, thanks for listening! ✌️

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[aaron_straker]:

Something to do with the connection, Happy Tuesday. guys, welcome back to another episode of each train. Prosper today, Brian and myself are going to go over some of our recent updates. We're going to talk a little bit about our favorite rear delt exercises and then the majority of the episode will be discussing Briryan's upcoming specialization cycle for hamstrings. I believe Brian. I'm not

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

mistaken, but let's get into updates and then we' jump into all that. So what's going on

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah, so uh, I'm officially on the end of my strength cycle. now, um, I just deemed it done. essentially. I, uh, I've been having a lot of fatigue and this is like now, the fourth or fifth week in a row that I talked about it, and so now with a little bit of distance between, you know, my first experience of this accumulated fatigue and then kind of now, um, I've realized a few things and I think it has mostly come down to going too heavy on the deadlift too early in the cycle, and um, it's something. I, uh, I probably should. I don't know if I should have known better like I was going off of subjective r p. E. It's just I when I pull a r. p E seven on the dead lift. I think that that the way that it taxes my system is as if I went to like a ten on like seven other movements or something like that, Um, like one rep at a seven is really hard. And then in prior weeks we had discussed Uh, kind of that subsequent mistake I made where I pulled that the really fast four sixty and I was like this is the best ever. I pulled for sixty and it flew up, and then four days later I went in like p, r, my six rep, r de l, and then since that point it's all been downhill. I. I don't think I've deadlifted a single uh, actual session, as it was scripted in my program Since that four sixty and then the r d l sequence, um. and on top of that my sleep has just been completely awful the last two weeks like literally

[aaron_straker]:

Ssssssssssssss.

[bryan_boorstein]:

ten to fourteen days. It's been terrible and it. it makes me think about the chicken and the egg thing of is, is the sleep a result of this fatigue that I've caused myself from these from the deadlifting and from the straing cycle. Or is my strength cycle suffering because my sleep is bad and it's probably a little bit of both. Uh, to be honest, but I have a feeling just because the sleep thing is so was so sudden and so weird and it, it's kind of started started. you know, a week or two after all of that mess with the dead lifts that, I kind of think I just did it to myself and I, the deadlift thing just took too much out of me. and, Um, essentially the way that it's affecting me is that I, I was like. I've always been someone that wakes up in the middle of the night when I sleep. I can't remember the last time I slept eight hours from beginning to end without waking up like I was probably in high school, and uh, so I always wake up once or twice, but I'll like stumble to the bathroom. I go. P. I stumble back to bed and I'm back asleep within two minutes. It's not a big deal. Now what's happening is I'm waking up three to six times a night and my temperature is always off. I'm either hot or I'm too cold. Usually hot and then cold. Uh, and then I can't fall back asleep because I'm like bothered by the temperature. I don't want to move and wake him up. I have things on my mind like whatever it is. Um, and if I wake up after three thirty, I'm just up for the day like there's no way after three thirty that I'm able to go back to bed, So these are all like really odd things for me And there isn't anything else going on in my life that would make me think that, uh that I, that I sh that it would be a problem that that's real that I could relate it to. Um, so I really just kind of relate it back to the dead lis thing and I wonder if it's just too much like. Maybe it's not even like the physical toll. but it's I can't get out of my head this psychological arousal piece and how much that plays a role and how much it affects me. Um, and so like yesterday as I was going to go test my, my, my, one, wp, uh, as I decided I wanted to do potentially at the end of this cycle. I, uh, I had to get like pretty aroused up just to do three sixty five, which moved really well And then I was like getting myself aroused up and was like Okay, Like four, oh five, r, p. e seven. This is my goal like let's do this, and I like got aroused up and I unracked the bar and I was just like not, fuck this, and I reacted again and I was like I don't need it. I was like I'm I'm at a a place in my life where I'm like, slightly discontent and slightly disappointed in myself for a messing the cycle up potentially and be not seeing it through. Um, but then there's another side of me that's like, really proud of myself for knowing that I'm in this state of fatigue and that you know put, continuing to push further wouldn't be a prudent move and could potentially put me even further down the hole. So I have a a bit of a balance of emotions here when it comes to the ending of this strangth cycle. But um, I definitely learned some stuff, and I think that at a minimum I, i realized that before all this fatigue hit me that I had already matched the strength numbers that I wanted. Like you know I was, I squatted three, eighty five, three, ninety, three, ninety five. and they all moved very well and quickly, And Um and I pulled a four sixty deadlift. That was the easiest four sixty I ever pulled. And these are all in comparison to to where I was five years ago, and at a body weight that was close to two hundred and ten pounds, and now I'm in the low one nineties, so I'm about fifteen pounds less and still moving the same weights that I was. then. So, um, I think eventually I'll probably attack another strength cycle in a year or so, and I will have learned a lot as far as what I can do and can't do in regards to to deadlift specifically, But uh, overall, I call it a success, and uh, really excited to to move into Diveretry. And I have a lot to discuss as far as that goes in the episode as we continue, but that would kind of be the the of the final thoughts that I have on the seven weeks of the strike cycle.

[aaron_straker]:

Okay, so I have a world of questions

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yes,

[aaron_straker]:

from what you just brought up, so I'd say that the most interesting thing to me is that you still like I. I don't want to say. interesting. Um. impressive. I, I guess maybe impressive, maybe also a little bit, uh, potentially negligent that you still con Continue to try and progress it with the very obviously poor sleep. Um, It's so. I mean, that's kind of tying it back to. Um. I, I mean we we. We bring up this phrase a lot, but like H. Pertrophy is such a forgiving adaptation

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm. Mhm.

[aaron_straker]:

right when you your sleeps down and your' P in you and you're not feeling so great, you can just reroduce low. You reduce slowad. You still take it to like a similar r. R. You can may be ch, changing out movements to more stimulative, less fatiguing movements. When you're trying to get strong in a back squat. you can't be like all. I'm just going to the leg extension and you know a little bit more day

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

like a re foot elevated with it' like No, you need to back squat in in match. you know intensities and type of things. So I, I mean the glaring thing to music. What is going on to sleep? So if if it truly is like you know business is good. relationships are good. All these other, kind of maybe emotional, seemingly less obvious aspects of your life. you're checking in the box. There. There's a reason s sleep is is tanked. Um, The temperature thing is a big one, so that one could be a little bit harder to control. I don't know Kim's standpoint. You know, type of thing I kind of will put my foot down and be like I'm I'm putting the a C at sixty five Like that's what I'm going to do. Type of deal. You might lose that battle. Fortunately, I've won it. There is something called a a chili pad

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

where you kind of and you can do it on like you know individual sides of the bed, So that could be something. I just know that like I'm a very sleep or sorry, temperature sensitive sleeper. If it gets too hot like I just can't fuck and sleep. I'm just I'm I'm miserable. I like it and I sleep really really well when it's cold. I just know this, Um, and there is some research to back that, so that's one thing. You could look at another thing what I would recommend and this is what I will generally do with clients, like if people are sleeping like, really really poorly, and it could be maybe work stresses like really, really picked up or something like that or training. I'm going to come in and just uh, kind of hit them pretty hard with adaptigences, So like in in Ashrognda, specifically, I uses product um from new ethics called quaiese. It's kind of like a little bit of like a sledgehammer approach, but I'll do that and then they also have a product called Lipozoma, Relax, and that is like the one two sleep combination like. I've used that with multiple multiple clients myself when people and people have like report like. I've never slept so good in my entire life. and it's different than like a. like. um, like a robotuscan type sleeper. You know something like that where it just like knocks you down, but you feel like you're drolling it all over yourself and that type of shit. Uh, so it's definitely just like a restful sleep. So that's

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm.

[aaron_straker]:

something that we can talk about off air, because at this point you just want to restore sleep. and if you need something to bridge a gap for a month until you can kind of figure it out by all means. Um, I think that would be very very beneficial for you personally. there. Hu.

[bryan_boorstein]:

uh, very quick. the lader jump in

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah,

[bryan_boorstein]:

before you. You cover everything temperature, so usually the temperature isn't an issue for me because I do keep the house at like sixty seven or sixty eight at night and that's pretty good for me. This temperature thing is just since the sleep has been disrupted. So there's it's again, like a sign of like, maybe something being disrupted internally with like my hormone function or something along those lines. Yeah, you ever thought on that,

[aaron_straker]:

no,

[bryan_boorstein]:

Okay? That makes sense. Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

I mean that's that's that's good. I, it. it's a. It's a okay, We that. it's probably not that type

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah, yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

of thing. The other thing is when you, when you said, like when I'll wake up at three a M. And then I'm just like up. Uh, That is often times early quarter all peeking.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

'cause course is all. what's what is what wakes

[bryan_boorstein]:

right.

[aaron_straker]:

us up rightright. It slowly begins to to rise throughout the night. It reaches a threshold where our body, you know, wakes up type of thing, And that's another one when people are when clients were por to me. I'm I'm waking up at like four a M. and I'm like wired and up. It's generally an El. Like your. Your court is alls peaking earlier, so it could be training

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

induced, right. Um. which is interesting because generally it's not as common in a lot of people where it is like just training. It's usually like Oh, it's you know, quarter end at work and I'm getting my fucking dick pushed the ground with you know work load. I'm having you know

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

relationship Tr. It's generally like a few things kind of peaking at once where people's stress is building. Um. It could also be a couple of other factors right, so we know that like melotonin is, uh, like counter regulatory with with quadtazal, So you might be. something might be going on. Maybe you're just like. maybe your screen time is creeping into the evening or something like that where your natural melottona production is not. You know where it used to be before, Um. It could also be testoster and regulated too be cause. testosterone is another. Uh. it's uh. It works Um, opposite of of Quatazal as well, so I mean, you could you could take a four point quarters all saliva test if you wanted to do that and see really what's going on with that curve. Um. but I would go the opposite routes first before going down the testing because it could be. Hey, you know, maybe stresses really has just peaked a lot from the from the strength training Um phase are are are block. and if you can kind of bridge that with some like Ashroganda and

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm, Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

adaptins, and some you know, um, um, what's the word? I'm looking for? herbal, kind of sleep help for like three weeks to four weeks to get you restored again and then where things will kind of level out on their own. That's probably what I would do first before moving into testing.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, you know what's interesting about it though, Is that like? the sleep thing is just like the last three or four hours of my sleep cycle, So I fall asleep so easily and so hard at like eight thirty? I literally am just

[aaron_straker]:

Mhm.

[bryan_boorstein]:

sitting there watching Tv and then I'm out and the next thing I know, its twelve thirty and I'm just up going pe. And'm like where did the last four hours going? I mean the exact same position that I fell asleep in, so I'm getting like some really really high quality sleep in like the first four hours. And then I think it's like that back half that I'm struggling with. Um, so maybe that is like some early cordical and stuff like that too, but I mean it does,

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah,

[bryan_boorstein]:

from from what I can tell, like it seems like I induceed this on myself from the training thing because I always like one to two times a night, like right back to sleep, like whenever I'm training hypertrophy, that's just the way it is like you know, V, uh, mitigating outside stresses like you mentioned, like lifestyle things. But but when it comes to just training like I just sleep well if I'm doing hypertrophy work. So there's something about what I did to myself within the stimulus of this specific cycle that I think has had that that impact on me. And uh, I guess it's just something to learn from and know that a four sixty dead left, even if it moves fast is significantly more fatiguing than I think it is. Um, so maybe you know I'm staying at four o five instead of four sixty, and then I'm doing my back off sets at like three thirty instead of at four oh five. You know so, Um, things like that could go a long way. I think in preserving me going forward,

[aaron_straker]:

it could have been one of those things where like physically, you are capable of moving those weights. but your

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

body was not necessarily prepared for that intensity at that kind of um frequency that quickly. So

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm, Yeah, the frequency is a huge one.

[aaron_straker]:

this was. This is like one of my Uh notes. This week, I did a narly hike with one of my clients on Sunday. It was like basically like rock scrambling. It was like a twenty six, twenty seven hundred foot elevation change

[bryan_boorstein]:

Oh yeah, I saw those pictures.

[aaron_straker]:

and like physically, I could do it, you know, and then later that day my body was like We are not okay with What the hell Did you

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

just do Because I'm not in like that type of shape to be doing that type of stuff. So that could be one of the things like That's the benefit of you know, like this style of training and you know how are you are physically

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mm,

[aaron_straker]:

capable. but you may not be actually like, prepared for the repercussions of what comes from performing that you know, capability type of thing,

[bryan_boorstein]:

it's like the downstream effect on the nervous system. Yeah, cause that's the way it feels to me like I feel like this. Yeah, it feels quarter soly like it. Kind of. do you know that like nervy feeling where you're just like, kind of like extra alert for no reason. kind of thing. Yeah, its.

[aaron_straker]:

Mhm, Mhm,

[bryan_boorstein]:

it's a weird feeling, but I feel like that. I. I. I feel like that happen. So um, it's it's all very interesting and ultimately, I'm just really glad to be moving on and uh and going back into Haveperry work. And uh, did I mention that? Did I tell you? I can't remember if I told you yet that I signed up for the Enon Practical next week. I did right.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, but it's like the week after the one that I cause, I, I leave tomorrow.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, yeah, the week after you're doing it. Yeah, yeah, so Aarin's doing the En one practical this week and we're going to grab dinner and hang out a little bit while he's in town, and then the very next week I am. Uh, I'm going to be doing the practical too, so it's wild that En one has them and back to back weeks. but um, but you also have it an n C of it.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, So and then the like, I guess the week you're at and one we come back and then have like three days you know, back to normal. See and and work and then there's an n. c. I, which is a nutrition coaching institute in Jason

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yep,

[aaron_straker]:

Phillips here in Scottsdale, and we're like already here. You know Why not go and do some networking and

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm.

[aaron_straker]:

learn stuff. So I'm excited for that too, So I mean anyone you know is on Uh, on the pot gas, Listening. If if you'll be in town for that and you want to maybe get some coffee, lift some weights. send me a message on inigram, and we will do that.

[bryan_boorstein]:

that's awesome. very cool.

[aaron_straker]:

Um, speaking of sleep, rightight, I have a little bit of a sleep update, so I've kind of like in the back of my mind back of hand, kind of known this, but I really solidified it this week and I purposefully attempted it again last night just to see if it was like a fluke or not. I am someone that just like does not. I don't know if metabollize is necessarily the correct word, but metaboze meloton, and well, like I can take, I'll take meloton in, and I am like groggy at shit in the morning, and like do not want to get out of bed And that is very, very uncharacteristic of me. So I'm like one of those people like six fifteen, six thirty. I'm like up, you know, popped out of bed, ready to go, Like, excited for the day. In the last two days I took Meloton in because on Sunday I wanted to go to bed super early because I was so beat up

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm.

[aaron_straker]:

from that hike, so I took it and then yesterday I think I think I su to like eight yesterday, which I mean, that's an hour. that's you know, ninety to a hundred minutes longer than I normally sleep. And I went to bed earlier and then last night I did it again. and I, actually, so I've been. You know, Um, putting my money where my mouth is, I keep my phone plugged in charge in the kitchen right, not in the bedroom. I got up this morning, went and walked to the kitchen, turned my phone alarm off and then fucking went back to bed And that's like.

[bryan_boorstein]:

That's like

[aaron_straker]:

It's like commitment to do that to get up and go turned off with the yeah. Yeah, and I was just like my

[bryan_boorstein]:

college hungover actions there.

[aaron_straker]:

like. and then even just like brushing my teeth, I was like. I'm still like eighty percent asleep. but I need to get up and start the day and it's only taking five milligrams. Um, you can. There are sometimes where we can find it in like two point five milligram in comms. Jenny's like the complete opposite. She's perfectly fine with it, but I just do not do very well with it. It, like will slog me kind of a little bit.

[bryan_boorstein]:

So I hate it. I. I used it maybe three or four times in my life, and by the way, they do have one milligram, three milligram, five miigram, Like you can get. However, whatever size you want,

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah.

[bryan_boorstein]:

I always found that every of each of the three or four times I took it, I had like a weird outer body experience where I felt like I was watching myself sleep and it just like it was odd like I would wake up groggy just like you and I never felt like I had like super restful sleep with it, so I don't do it anymore.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah. Well, what's really interesting is I've seen Um some studies where they. I think they will, man. I. re. I really wish I could remember. specifically. they'll use high doses of meloton in to counteract Um quarterz all, and I remember. I. I think I. I wish I could remember. I think upwards of like a hundred milligrams and I was like

[bryan_boorstein]:

That's a lot. Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

Whoa. I might like a hundred milligrams of melotone, and would put me into the eternal sleep like I would not wake up.

[bryan_boorstein]:

the eernal sleep. Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

Um. So it's really interesting and just kind of goes until like there's so much individual variability in in person to person with different things. Um. there was something I saw from Uh, Doctor Ben House this this morning on um, uh, l d, l levels, and and dietaryian taken stuff like that and it was getting a little bit heated. Um, because people obviously have differing opinions, but it was one of those things that's like it's gonna be personal

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

person dependent, Kind of like my experiment, right, I dropped Mc garbs one high fat and my glucose and Um, h, b, o n

[bryan_boorstein]:

yep,

[aaron_straker]:

C got worse, and my l d, l uh, went up considerably by almost like A. by, almost probably like thirty percent, thirty forty percent, which is pretty wild

[bryan_boorstein]:

y.

[aaron_straker]:

or no, almost fifty. I'm not the best of math. Um, and then I guess the the last thing for me update that I have is Jenn and I are doing this thing where as we' both intrition coaches. Obviously a lot of people will struggle with like meals out, restaurant meals and type of things. So we're doing this thing we called the Date night series. We're goingnna do like eight to ten different types of restaurants and then break down like these are the types of things you want to order. This is the reasons why we generally will you know, avoid these types of things just to provide you know for for clients and stuff like that, like really turn key options. And so you can just they can feel very empowered with their decisions and not feel like. Um, like they can't participate in stuff on. Just No, okay, and in these situations this is exactly what we will do type of deal. So, um, I'm excited for that and then it, you know, gives us a reason to go on dates. but there's still work dates. I suppose, but well,

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah. Now that's a great idea that. I think that's going to be very helpful for people too. Is this going to go on Youtube?

[aaron_straker]:

probably not.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Okay, instrams.

[aaron_straker]:

That's a lot. That's a lot of extra work.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, I was just

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah,

[bryan_boorstein]:

curious how how involved this is going to be Likexra professional production. like, like camera following you around, Like as you enter

[aaron_straker]:

no, no,

[bryan_boorstein]:

the restaurant.

[aaron_straker]:

I'm not ready for that level of anxiety in public with a camera following me.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Totally, Yeah, I feel that cool. Um, sweet. Should we jump into Uh into program design?

[aaron_straker]:

Ah, let's do it.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Oh, and there's a note here that says Kiewies are great. That's from your that's or your updates. Tell me about it,

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, Yeah, I did have a. I did have a note like. Yeah, it was man, so like you, I mean, Obviously you would have them and then when we were we were planning our. Obviously, we were like getting shit for our our drive down and I just saw the kes. You know, Brian loves a keys. I'm just going to buy them like. I think maybe I had them once in my life or whatever, And I've just been buying them like I really really enjoy them. And there's also two. like they're higher in fiber when you when you eat the skin, and that it's like. it's like a little bit of a like. I know I should get this because of the fiber. So it is. there's. there's more. Um, what's the word I'm looking for? Like? not like. there's a higher inclination to get it because I know it's better

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm, Mhm, Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

for me type of thing I'm Oh, I can get fiber here too. so uh, but yeah, there. I like. I have tri two of them a day, and now I've been experimenting with like the golden kies. And there are these like red type jas, that are a little different but they're just fantastic so I've uh, definitely become a fan,

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

so thank you for kind of just uh, influencing me to start eating kiwies.

[bryan_boorstein]:

absolutely they. They're my Uh, first or second favorite fruit and they have been for for twenty years them in uh, and cherries cherries are are really good. They're just only around for a few months here.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, yes, cherries in the summer is. uh, it is a treat. for sure.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yp are sweet. Let's talk program design. So, if you guys have not yet listened to the episode from last week with Caathain Hanson, I highly suggest that, because, Uh, I decided to take the opportunity to ask him a personal question at the end of our podcast episode about Uh, kind of some specialization factors, Um that I could consider when designing my new cycle. So, um, just in case anyone hasn't kept up on the saga of our lives for the last forty six episodes, Um, I went to Fort Collins a couple of months ago, met with Brian Miner, Albert, New Erbo, Alberto Nuonez. They told me that I look pretty good, but my hams strings suck for what we can tell. Um at this moment, and they suggested I designed like an off season where I basically just prioritize hams strings for basically a year. or so. Um, which is cool, because I actually like training ham strings, which is kind of surprising that they're not good, because usually the things you enjoy training are pretty solid, but um, I've been kind of racking my brain with different ways to design this thing And then when I pose that question to Castum, he said something that I hadn't considered yet and uh, he had three suggestions and I'll go over those real quick. Uh, one of them was volume ramping, so this is kind of like what Doctor Mike uses with R. P. Where you start a messocycle at a lower number of sets, and then over the course of the mastercycle, you add sets, so that at the end you're essentially at your m. r v, a maximum recoverable volume, And uh, and that's one thing I didn't consider because yeah, uh, not because it is a great idea, Because the main mitigating factor I'm having in my program design is that my hamssterrings get really sore, but we know that via the repeated bout effect that as you do things in subsequent weeks you'll get less sore, which means that I could potentially add sets and achieve the same, or maybe even less soreness than I did the prior week, So I really liked that volume ramping idea. Um cassum also had an idea of potentially having one day that's more mechanically damaging, So this would be things like r. D, ls, and good, maybe good mornings, Um, hip extensions potentially, and then have another day. That's more like short overload focus, so it would be like more leg curls. Um, I'd probably break out like single leg curls and use the cable machine and stuff like that. Have a few variations in there, Um, and maybe could even put hip extensions on that day as well, where I would uh, potentially bias the top position of the movement instead of biasing like the stretch or the length and position, So Um, that's something that I am also considering along with volume ramping. Yes, hand up, How can I help you?

[aaron_straker]:

how would you bias in hip extension? The opposite

[bryan_boorstein]:

So essentially you just wouldn't go to the top position you would. Only you would go deep into the stretch at the bottom and then you would come up, maybe like two thirds three quarters of the way, and you wouldn't actually uh, uh, when you cross the the horizontal plane of the world right where your

[aaron_straker]:

Mhm.

[bryan_boorstein]:

body crosses horizontal. Um, that's where we really get into that like short overload limitation, so I would probably just take it up until about horizontal, and then reverse direction and go back down again.

[aaron_straker]:

That is kind of what I um, inherently do with them. The the. the hip extension to me is just. it's a fascinating movement because there's so you can change

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

it with these little tweaks and like something I'll do if I bend my knees. If I don't like to lock my knees out, you know like

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

keep them, you know, not like. Like all a break in my knee and won't want fully locked them out. It completely

[bryan_boorstein]:

I know what you mean, Yeaha,

[aaron_straker]:

changes like the, the, Um, the

[bryan_boorstein]:

yep,

[aaron_straker]:

stimulus and stuff like that. I mean, it's just I don't know, so I feel like there could be this incredible video of someone showing the like seven different ways that you can use the hip

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

extension for like colluts and hamstrings and the new onces between

[bryan_boorstein]:

I love that,

[aaron_straker]:

them. It's just fantastic. I feel like it's super under utilized.

[bryan_boorstein]:

totally. No, and I, um, I'm still down because I got this stupid hip extension machine without the calf pads. so I, I have it now like stuffed in my furnace room because there's no room for it in my gym. Um,

[aaron_straker]:

I saw that

[bryan_boorstein]:

but I am going to use it in this hams string specialization. I'm just not exactly sure how much load I can handle. So, uh, one of the things I put on my story the other day was that I found that if when you begin to ascend out of the hip extension, if you slam your quads into the pad, kind of like what you were saying like almost slightly bending the knee instead of squeezing the glues to ascend, then it's significantly harder. I mean way way way harder. When I, when I contract my gluts I, I can do twelve rucks with eighty five pounds in each hand, so a hundred and seventy pounds. and when I was doing the way where you just kind of slam your quads in and you don't squeeze the glutes, I was using half of that weight for less reps, so I think

[aaron_straker]:

that's exactly

[bryan_boorstein]:

that Yeah, as far as stimulus to fatigue goes, and as far as like specifically for the hams string, that shit makes way more sense.

[aaron_straker]:

yeah. I was going to say I did. I did him that way on Friday and I used one forty pound dumbbell and I was faing like around Arap. eight, nine.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, yeah, yeah, so I think you like Ti, your point, man. The the hip extension has so many different ways, like so much utility. and I would love that if someone would make a post on that like, maybe I'll at some point gather my thoughts on it. I don't know if I know enough. I need to experiment with it more before I do something like that, but that would be a great post for Casser or pal Carter, or something like that.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah,

[bryan_boorstein]:

Um, so so those are two of the ways, The the one day with the mechanical tension, Uh, focus and the stretch, and then one day with short overload, focus, Uh, the potential idea of volume ramping, and then Cass's third idea, which I also had never really thought of was What If you just don't even worry about frequency and you just like go destroy your hams strings like go do like you know, eight, twelve, fifteen sets or whatever it is, and just expect that you're going to be sores. Fuck for like a week and then when you're not sore anymore you just go train them again and that's a a very like sledge hammer approach to the situation. But it's something I haven't tried like I've actually really been trying to manipulate frequency. I'm like, how can I get more frequency in? because that's what my hamstrings need is more frequency. Maybe they don't need more frequency. Uh, maybe they just need more recovery. Um, which also brings me to a point that Brian Miner made when I was up in Fort Collins when he was talking about this, because I pose the same question to him of like, Hey, my hamshoings get really sore. Like, what should I do about this and his response was like, Maybe you just extra recover by doing less in the rest of your body, So you do less upper body? You maybe do less quads And then that opens up all this recovery currency that you can use for your ham strings. Um, so I think, kind of the idea of combining all of these approaches Like kind of some of the ideas that cast them through out with Caa. What'brien was saying? Um, I've begun to kind of construct a cycle in my head, and so I can go over that in a second. Do you have any thoughts or questions before I do?

[aaron_straker]:

yeah. one thing I. I thought of that just kind of popped in my head. Another thing is you could even, um, just eat more on your hamstring

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

specific day to throw extra recovery currency at it. you know, especially as you are going through this transition where you need to fix your sleep

[bryan_boorstein]:

mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

a little bit too, cause, I mean that those are two primary recovery pathways. Sleep in

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

calories right. so if you're suffering in one department, you can kind of bolster another,

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, my body weight is pretty stable right now slightly climbing. so I think that I'm in a surplus, but I guess I could always like hammer that a little bit harder.

[aaron_straker]:

but also the sleep too.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

like your sleep's been pour for fourteen days. That will skew things. Um, I mean, I don't saying negatively, but north,

[bryan_boorstein]:

right right right, that's a good point. Um, okay, cool. So what I have right now and this is subject to change? Um, I should also say before I do that, because I'm going to end one on December ninth through the twelfth. I'm probably not actually going to officially start this off seaason cycle until I get back from N one, because I feel like there's just going to be a bunch of like random shit thrown at me And like do pendulum squats, Do ryl do leg curls. Like doesn't really make sense, so I'm probably going to just kind of have a one and a half ifish. I guess now it's two weeks would be two weeks of like lower key, kind of focusing on mostly cable movements and just kind of trying to flush some of this fatigue out of my system, And I think that it'll actually be good for me to have ten days before I go to N one, and then two weeks before I start my new trading cycle. Um, instead of trying to jump into it this next week, Um, okay, cool. So the way I have it designed right now is that there's a full leg day on the first day and it's a hamstring priority which means the hamssterreing movements are done first. I currently have it where it's not just a mechanical tension day. So I have like one short movement and one stretch movement on that day and then I have a second day, Um, where I also have like a stretch and a and a short movement on there. Um, I'm not sure if I'm going to keep it that way just because Um, I don't know the the volume ramping is the main tool I want to use. and then I think that depending on how that goes, I may adjust some of the other tools. Um, but initially I want to try the volume ramping with like evenly split days and see how my body handles that, and see if I can keep frequency at twice a week. So, anyway, that's my my little intro there. so the first day's a leg day. second day is a chest back day, but it's it's lower volume and it's only two movements for each area. So, uh, it's going to be a day where I can really get a lot of recovery because that day's not like a full workout day, and then the next day's a rest day, so I think that that should give me a lot of a kind of bang for my buck as far as like recovering the hams strings et cetera leading into the next day. Um, so then after the rest day, I have a day that's shoulders and hams strings, so I'm doing the hamssterring stuff first and then shoulder second, Uh, and then the day after that is a quads abs and calves day. so I have legs and back to back days, but I'm doing the hamstring stuff first after a rest day, so I'll have more energy to put into the hamssterring stuff. Follow that up with a quad day, and then I th the abs and calves on there, because that's probably the only way to ensure that I do them is to like put a day that has them on it with quads instead of it being like legs plus abs and calves, Because then I would never do it. Um, and then there's another rest day after that, that leged at quad day, and then I have a full upper body day and the full upper body day again is going to be. You know five exercises. So it's not. It's barely going to cover the whole body. There's going to be some arm stuff in there. Um, and essentially the whole idea of this is doing less for my upper body, so I have like that chest in Backda. Then I have shoulders thrown in on a hams string day, and then I have a full upper body day, so none of these upper body days should be super taxing to the upper body, which should allow the three leg days that I have to really kind of do their job and the other tangential benefit that I'm thinking about this is I. My quads are still not like a strong point like they're better than my ham strings, potentially, but this also gets me to quad days a week, and it gives me a day where I'm just focusing on quads which is also a benefit.

[aaron_straker]:

I like the splitting of the quads and the hams strings. That's something that I want to try in in the future cause I feel like I always. I mean, I preference like my. My quads are my my goal.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm.

[aaron_straker]:

You know by one, I guess, because I can see them and you can't really see your ham strings. but it. they're hard to train in the same day because they' just such big muscle groups and the movements are generally is kind of harder. You know what

[bryan_boorstein]:

y. Yep,

[aaron_straker]:

I mean. Like doing like a hack. Squa and then like, Oh fuck. I have alls now'. just a lot. you know. So I do like that. splitting it up. The question

[bryan_boorstein]:

right right,

[aaron_straker]:

I have for you is, um, how many total days and like, Is this like a nine day cycle, ten day cycle,

[bryan_boorstein]:

So it's actually five training days and

[aaron_straker]:

Mhm,

[bryan_boorstein]:

it's written over a seven day week, but I think that more than likely it's going to turn into an eight day week. I, I'm going to do everything I can not to let it turn into a nine or a ten unless life happens and then I'm okay with that. Um. but um, I think over eight days would be great because that would be five training days and three rests. So it's it's both legs. It's quad hams, Then it's chests back and it's rest, then it's uh, hands and shoulders and its quads andbss, Then it's rest, then it's full body, So it's possible that I go like on the on the return trip. I might go like full body legs rest, so the rest days might switch each week, depending cause I kind of like the two on one off two on one off kind of thing. So if I

[aaron_straker]:

Mhm,

[bryan_boorstein]:

have five sessions then that might just like naturally fall into that rotation.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, I really like that and I mean this is one of the I would say, one of the biggest things I picked up from you this year that I really really like is the non calendar week

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

training week. It. It's just like. It just makes things so much more flexible and realistic for life. So what? I and I think, this is something that a lot of people still aren't doing, But it's like, Oh, well, I can only train you know three days a week. and now I don't know which days to skip Or should I make them up,

[bryan_boorstein]:

right,

[aaron_straker]:

Type of thing. You know, people get like. So like analysis prolysis by it and I'm just like Oh, you know, I only trained three three days Like I was looking at my calendar this week. I, I haven't really lifted weights that many

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

times in November, and I was like, like the majority of the weeks. I've only been in the gym three

[bryan_boorstein]:

right,

[aaron_straker]:

days. Um, and that's very historically low for me, but I was just like it. Just it's just better cause in the past I would go in like half ass of work out. I' like. Oh, I got thirty minutes. I'll me, just do some shit and check the box where now I'm like, No, I'm just going to rest and when I have the time and you know the day I come in and I hit it

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

right and I think ultimately that that ladder is the best approach. Um, and it's just like I. I really like that, you know, and I'm kind of sayk. thanks for you know. pushing that on to me. I do appreciate it.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, Dee, for sure, for sure. I, uh, I have a interesting, uh podcast reference about this too, so uh, shout out code bomboo. He had a Chris Barric Catt on the other day and Barra Catt just got his pro card after like ten years of trying, which is really cool and he really brought like an incredible package. Didn't lose any muscle on the dieting down and stuff like that. And uh, so he was on Cody's podcast And this is one of the things he was saying regarding the calendar We stuff is. Uh, he was like, You know, one of the biggest changes that I made in in my prep this year is that instead of being rigidly stuck to like I have to train on these days, he's like. I honestly could care less whether my messo, my microcycle took me six, seven days or ten days. He's like. My main priority was that I would be mentally and physically ready to attack the weights and force my body to hold on to as much muscle as possible, and I can't do that if I'm going into a session when I'm not as mentally focused or physically uh prepared as I need to be. So I will always you know, take that extra day or two days or whatever it is, to make sure that my mind is where it needs to be going into that session. and and I think that that just kind of puts a bow on that whole idea of like it's the effort that you put in that's going to give you the result. And if you go into that session just because it's on your calendar and you're like I have to do this almost like a chore. then you might not be giving that session everything that you should be giving it

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, it's like the to, saying up more and be better is better.

[bryan_boorstein]:

better. better. Yeah, that is better. Yeah, exactly. So that's cool. I'm really glad that was helpful for you and at you know, fuck, you're not going to lose muscle Like like you're You're trainding three times a week like I've been training three times a week for eight weeks now. I don't think I've lost muscle. It's just it's wild how easy it is to maintain it and how neurotic people get thinking that they need to train a certain amount.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, and I'm a hundred percent hundred percent super guilty of of the ladder for many many years, cause it's just like I knew that the high volume worked for me and I I needed it. But now I mean, I really don't, and now since you know, I don't want to talk too much about my die, but uh, we've shifted to basically hier car again to to

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yep,

[aaron_straker]:

get my um, my ldl back down and improve my, uh, my glucos and stuff, and my weight's like up a little bit. So now I'm usually in the like, one, ninety two, one, ninety three, but I still like. basically, I'm basically look the best I ever

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

have, and I'm training pretty much. I feel very confiting, like the least I ever have in eighteen years.

[bryan_boorstein]:

physique a recovery game. dude.

[aaron_straker]:

Mhm.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, for sure. Um, Well, if you want to move under, like our, our topic for the day, so to speak,

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, about the some yourdults,

[bryan_boorstein]:

cool. Yeah, so uh, we actually have a a question as well that we could address potentially at the end. But um, so this ties into another thing I want to talk about, which was kind of some of the variation and cool stuff that you can do with cables. Um, especially with a functional trainer like I have now where you have dual cables. Um, so seaun. Yeah, totally

[aaron_straker]:

It's a game changer, It's a game changer

[bryan_boorstein]:

chante the the movement Miistro. We love her on this show. Um, she really helped me, you know, get my heel healed up. I like what I did there, Um. But if for an update for anyone, the heel is like ninety percent better now. so so life's back to normal and I appreciate Chante's help in Uh, fossing my nerves and all those fun things. But Um, she posed a question to me and she actually requested me to do a post on this, and I figured that it might be more fun for us to talk about it on the podcast Uhcause, Then we can kind of have some back and forth and and provide a little more deeper context than we can if it's just an Instm post. But Um, she asked what our favorite exercises are for reardults, Or I think we could even take it in the direction of just like a thorough analysis of different movements that you can do for the redults. Um,

[aaron_straker]:

Mhm,

[bryan_boorstein]:

and then I think that it also really is enhanced by the ability to use cables, which is something that Um. Cassum was talking about on Oh man, it was either Abels or Dave Macone's podcast I listen to on both of those recently, but on one of those he was talking about how there's so much variation you can do with the upper body because we have limbs and oposable thumbs that we can like you know, move across our body, and like train the torso right, But he was like with your legs, you don't have that freedom. Like, even with a cable machine like that like you're not going to take your leg, and like take it across your body, because there's no like torso in the middle for you to train like you, Kind of just can't you you? You can't grab things with your legs right. So leg training in its nature, it almost like it has to be planted on the ground or or in a machine to stabilize right, Whereas with cables in our upper body, we can put our body into different positions and use the cables to then train different positions and really get like super acute with the target stimulus. Um, so I just wanted to bring that up because I think that as we get into rear delt movements like there's there's good ones that you can do with free weights and bands and things like that. and then there's like really really good ones you can do with cables. So I think almost like separating those out into two categories is important.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, because it changes your your your low

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm.

[aaron_straker]:

distribution too. And and how Um equally distributed that load is, I mean, it's going to be variable with something like a band, very variable with something like a dumbbell, or when you move to the cable, you have that pretty much equal resistance curve throughout

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

the the movement, which is just very beneficial.

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah, so the the main problem we're going to experience with reardults when we're using free weits is that they're all going to be short overload. Um. it's going to be very difficult to train the reardults in a length and overload position. It's actually even kind of challenging with cables because to get a length and overload on the rear delt, you kind of have to come like across the body. It's almost like the inverted of the cast press around. It's like the finish position of the Cra cast rest Ro is how you would stretch the rear delt if you were if they was pulling you in the opposite direction. Um. And then you would kind of pullt back and down to train that rear, don't lengthened Um, which I actually just learned recently and and I've never tried it, so I think that it would be kind of like a cool movement to experience, Um. But cables also provide you even beyond the ability to do uh, a overload in the stretch position. It also provides you an even tension curve so that you have some resistance in the stretch position even if you're doing just like a typical, like cable crossover rays where you know you have the the crossover cables and you're pulling out or whatever, Um, there is tension at the stretch position, Whereas when you have Dubells and you're bent over or you're prone on a bench, or whatever it is, Um at that bottom position there is no tension on the reardult, so I think that that's an important, uh, kind of caveat to stay as well,

[aaron_straker]:

It, because it's like the like, the Dumbll kickback rate for the first

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah.

[aaron_straker]:

ninety degrees of that movement you have zero, Probably not zero. but you

[bryan_boorstein]:

Very, yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

have incredibly know little tension on the triet because the Du just hanging off your muscul with you, not even your

[bryan_boorstein]:

right,

[aaron_straker]:

muscule to your skeletal system.

[bryan_boorstein]:

right, right,

[aaron_straker]:

So yeah, it's one of those things. once you learn these concepts like it will revolutionize how you think about certain movements.

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah, yeah. so one thing I used to think for for many years, and I think this was a result of uh, bodybuilding in the nineties and early two thousands, where the the name rear delt fly. You almost just kind of assumed that it was the reverse of the peck fly, so you would kind of perform it the same way, like you would either bend over or you would lay down and you would bring your arms out to the side in that like, um, you know, bent over position, and that was what was called a reardult fly. So for many, many many years, that's the way I performed it, Um. And it wasn't until uh, really kind of the the stuff with N one and cassum where I realize that when the arms come straight out to the side like that in a bent over position, we're gonna be getting a lot more of that romboid structure, so it's gonna be like mid traps, Uh, some upper traps, Um, probably some little bit of terries in there as well, definitely some reardlts, but I think that it's going to be dominated by like the traps, the mid traps, and the Uh, the rom booid structures. So what? then one guys have shown is that the the natural path for the reardults is actually going to be slightly down and out. So instead of going directly out like where your arm would form a tea at the top of the wp. Um, it's more like elbows talkcked, thirty to fifty degrees or something, along those lines, depending on your structure, and then the rear delts are scapular retractors, so you wouldn't want to say you're training your rear delts unless you're actually pulling as far as you can, given your range of motion. Um, of course, the the mid traps are also scalpular attractors, so um, so you are going to also train some some mid traps. It's not to say that you know by performing it this way it's just for your adults and the other ways just mid traps. Like there's going to be Um, variable levels of each with with both variations, But I think the more that you can do your rear delt focused movements with your arms coming slightly down, Um is going to be more beneficial for that structure, Um, and then so with that in mind, I think that some of the best

[aaron_straker]:

S.

[bryan_boorstein]:

reard exercises you can do are exercises that people commonly think of as back exercises. Um, so I think like a a Dubell row like a a typical dumbbo row if you don't row into your waistline and you don't let that umbell kind of scrape up along your body, but you kind of let those elbows pop out a little bit. That is probably one of the best movements you can do. Uh, for the reardults with free weights and then uh, that can be emulated across a a ton of different rowing variations like you can do, like a cheest supported row. That way, a seal row, uh, a one arm row. You can do a barbll row if you want to. I mean, I think the reardults they, they do react pretty well to being pronated, Uh, whereas the Lats really want you to be in like a neutral grip, but um, I think the reardlts might even respond better to like a mixed grip. So it's like What I mean by mix is it's not fully pronated and it's not fully neutral. It's almost like the same path that your elbow would take as it goes in right, so it it lines up perfectly with the movement pattern that you're trying to implement. Um. So like my Tbr row machine at home has those handles that aren't fully pron and they're not fully neutral. They're like forty five degree handles and those just rip me apart. They're so good, so if you can either use D handles like uh, cable handles that move or um, or if you have any like angles, grips, or anything like that, where you can change like a fully pronated position to a slightly permenaded position, I think that also helps the cause thoughts. Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

so yeah, I mean. So what I, what I think is really interesting is I have. what. What are my favorite rear dealt exercise now? and I feel like it's going to change one's

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

cast. and and then one team. Show me. you know what I don't know in a couple days, but I always like training them with the cable and what I have found what works best for me because it's one of those muscles that. its. It's a small muscle surrounded by like massive other muscles. I like to train them. Um, what's that?

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm.

[aaron_straker]:

unilaterally? so like one hand at a time so that I can focus more on one place instead of trying to do both at

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm.

[aaron_straker]:

the same time, Right? And my favorite way to train them is actually W with a cable stack kind of bent over. Um, like let's say, for example, you would be doing maybe like a, like a tricep kickback

[bryan_boorstein]:

Oh, is it coming across your body? Oh? okay? okay, okay, okay,

[aaron_straker]:

with a cable, But then I, No, no, but straight straight straight on. but then you keep your elbow kind of fixed and you're just growing back. Um, but what's nice is you can back up a little bit and get that. Oh, sorry, you can get that big stretch

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah, yeah, yeah, okay,

[aaron_straker]:

in front of you so you can load it a little bit in that lengthen

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah, yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

position and then come all the way you know back and it's going to get a little bit of like. Um, uh, what's that? like the terries there as well, but it. I mean that's by far my favor, and you need a little bit of trice upp, as well, because you're obviously moving that, But do you don't want to try? You don't want your. I don't like my arm completely locked out, but I don't want it superbent, but just like a break in the elbow. So um, but I love doing them that way.

[bryan_boorstein]:

dude, you should try it coming across your body, so set up in that same position, but pull the one on where the right hand is across with the left hand. Just even

[aaron_straker]:

Mhm,

[bryan_boorstein]:

like in my mind as I like, think about that. I can already feel the tenention. I'm going to try that.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, so I, I think that is the best way that I have found. Um, because it's it's it's

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm.

[aaron_straker]:

simple, right, I think a lot of them are. They're complex and you're moving around some other structure like you know, the The peck, the reverse, You know, Pecdec fly, which is like the common way. most people will train them right. you're You're confined to other structures that are you know, maybe don't fit you the best. And that's where the cable's

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

just going to be fantastic Because you can. I'm going to move a little bit to the left. I'm going to move a little bit to

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

the right. I'm going to try my, you know, a neutral grip. I'm going to try the de handandle like you can just modify it to to what you can find fits you. Well. Yeah,

[bryan_boorstein]:

to fit perfectly. Yeah, no, I love that that's great. I mean any time you can use a cable for a structure like that, that's going to be hugely advantageous. Um. I had a question the other day on. it was either Instrammar in our Facebook group. Uh, someone asked me about face polls and whether they're good for Re adults. And so I think that given what we know now about the elbow path for the rear adults, I think that a well and and I would say that I felt this before, too, but I'm more confident of it now. I always felt like a face pull to me was more of a a lateral delt focus, because the elbows are coming up almost like they do in a y, raise. Um. So any time you have to raise that arm up like that, you're going to get a lot of of lateral delt in there. and whenever I teach the face poll, I always teach that the elbows stay higher than the hands, Um. So, for that reason, I think that it's more of a of a lateral delt focus. whereas, if you were to do a face poll, that was more into like the neck line, where the elbows could travel a little bit further down, and the hands may finished above the elbows. I think at that point you know, some people still call that a face poll. I would call that like, Uh, I would call that like a row. I would call probably call a highro or something, but Um, people might call that a face poll, and that would be a good a good rear de exercise. Um. yeah, I don't know if I have a whole lot more to add on that.

[aaron_straker]:

maybe we'll have a follow up in two to three

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

weeks once we're both through the practical and will have a whole new world of things to talk about with the rear, adults. So we will see

[bryan_boorstein]:

exactly cool. very cool. Um, we had a just a real quick question. Do you want to kick this around? F.

[aaron_straker]:

sure

[bryan_boorstein]:

Cool. so, uh, the question on on an intiggram came to me and I just thought it was a interesting idea to kind of throw out some of our theoretical or anecot anecdotal ideas on it. So the question was what are your thoughts on the benefits of isolation movements for beginners as a means to connect mind to muscle. Or are they just better off working on compound movements for body awareness and strength?

[aaron_straker]:

this one's hard and and I don't feel strongly in either direction. Personally, I feel like if you go down the path of it could be a slippery slope. Is what I'm kind of getting out with with isolation movements because you might end up placing too much emphasis on them based on based on you, your your not a novice status and then pots, What's the word? I'm looking

[bryan_boorstein]:

Catch twenty two, Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

for? The opportunity cost. Yeah, sorry, the opportunity cost of that time and energy.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

you could be Sp. Learning how to brace properly move through the compounds with you know of. so I, I don't know how much benefit there is to that mind muscle connection on an isolation in the very very beginning, because it is something that you will slowly kind of build over time.

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah, I think you said that really. Well, uh, I think in my mind there are pros and cons to doing that. Um, I also question, and I haven't worked at the beginner in a really long time, so if anyone is relatively novice, you know, filfrida to shoot me a dam and let me know, But I wonder whether making that mind muscle connection through an isolation movement is even like going to be super strong in the beginning. I feel like Yeah, I. I. I feel like you're just going to be learning how to move Like. Regardless of whether you're doing an isolation movement or a compound movement, you're going to be creating neural adaptations to said movement. Um, and I just don't know that that matters like. if it's isolation or compound, you're still just going to be learning. so I, I'm I'm not sure that you're going to have the bandwidth in your brain and nervous system to make a mind muscle connection. That that is meaningful at that point. Um, so I, I lend myself more to just saying you know, Get the most bang for your buck like you're a newbie if you like. If you want to do isolations instead of doing squats. For example, you would have to do leg extensions. Glute kickbacks Potentially like some sort of aductor work. Um, there would be maybe even calves like the squat. Literally. When you're a beginner, it will hyperchrof your calves. Because you're standing under load with weight. You're not doing a calrase with it. You're just standing with weight, so it seems like a massive waste of your time and energy to go and have to do all of these different movements instead of just doing one movement. That's going to help you build all of these capabilities That that benefit you going forward

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah and y. and you're kinda just kicking the can down road because you're going to need to learn how to squat eventually. Anyway,

[bryan_boorstein]:

right right, right,

[aaron_straker]:

um, I mean, Obviously some things you know like there isn't that much like some of the simpler body parts are like a bicep right. Okay, you can do a bar bell, biy, su cral. I mean, that's kind of an

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm.

[aaron_straker]:

isolation. still, anyway, because of just the simplicity of the of the joint.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yep, it's a single joint movement.

[aaron_straker]:

Really? Yeah, single joint movement exactly, but I, yeah, I'm I'm just not. I don't feel very strongly that you can even really create that much of a mind of muscle connection in the beginning 'cause I think like those, those like neural adaptations. Or maybe I don't even know. I just feel like you're You're missing the components that need to be there for that to happen.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

Um, I have a. I would do have a really funny story about that. Actually, that I just remembered from when I was younger when I first got into like lifting weights and stuff. I don't know. I'm like, you know, fourteen, fifteen years old. I really wanted to be able to like make my chest move. You know how you can just like flex it and you can. you can bounce the packs and my stepd. My

[bryan_boorstein]:

Boun, the pax. Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

stepdad could do it. and like he, you know, lifted in like high school and college, But he can't touch a weight for pro, Probably two decades to this point and you could still do it, And I was like. How like teach me how I wa to be able to do that and he's like one day you can just do it and like I totally didn't buy, and I' like he just doesn't want to fuck and teach me and then I shit you not like a year later, two years later I remember like one day I could just do it and it was the holy shit that happened like he wasn't lying to me and I had no idea how, but it was like one day I could jet, like that connection to how to move. Them, like was literally just there, which is like could be me, just not remembering right or whatever, but that's how I remember. it' like one day I could just bounce my backs after not being able to for my entire life.

[bryan_boorstein]:

had you been training prior to the time that you asked him to teach you?

[aaron_straker]:

I was probably like right when I started. maybe a month or two or something

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, so yeah, I'm wondering how much of that has to do with like the

[aaron_straker]:

like that.

[bryan_boorstein]:

ability to connect to the muscle, but also having enough muscle there to bounce Because maybe you just didn't have any muscle before and you're like how am I supposed to contract something that isn't there? You know.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, and that's kind of what I meant

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

with. Like the mind muscle

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

connection, Like how do you connect to? like? I don't know. Like a. I mean, Obviously everyone has musculture there, but it's like you have. Like your basic human function,

[bryan_boorstein]:

right,

[aaron_straker]:

musc muscularure, Um, but yeah, especially for something like a back or whatever, Like how, it, maybe it's

[bryan_boorstein]:

dude,

[aaron_straker]:

harder to create that connection

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

because you just don't barely have any there. You have. Like your minimum, Blinon to be a human type of muscle type of deal.

[bryan_boorstein]:

I mean, it takes people a decade sometimes or longer to learn how to connect to their lats, I mean

[aaron_straker]:

Mhm,

[bryan_boorstein]:

like, Yeah, it, it's wild. I mean pe. I, the amount of people that that have no clue what they're actually training with their back and they're actually still arm pulling Ten years into training. I see it all the time. so um, so yeah, I think that that the the mirror muscles are definitely easier to contract. I mean shit, not, I haven't practiced posing cause I'm just I don't know. I can't get myself to do it, but I cannot figure out how to contract my hams string like when I without weight, like I can do it with weight. And and you know, pull my leg up and I can. I can do a leg curl and contract it, but I can't figure out how to how to fully activate it without stressing the rest of my body. Uh, when I'm just standing there, So you know things that that

[aaron_straker]:

Hm.

[bryan_boorstein]:

you just have to practice and learn over time. Cool. that's all I got man.

[aaron_straker]:

yeah, yeah, same. um, So I mean it' a prettyical episode covered some different things with

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yep,

[aaron_straker]:

us. Obviously, the rear do conversation, which uh, I want to revisit once we know more be cause. I feel like we may have new

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, absolutely

[aaron_straker]:

new answers or I feel like Cass or someone. you. Yeah, Yeah, and that movement's fucking stupid. I wants do this instead.

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah. Why would you do that one arm cable row thing like

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, so I'

[bryan_boorstein]:

just do a a pull down

[aaron_straker]:

yeah, So I feel like there may be some of that And then I do definitely want to update the listeners as I learn more. Um, but yeah and I will catch a guys

[bryan_boorstein]:

eight.

[aaron_straker]:

next week. My mouse was on there.

Introduction
Bryan’s strength cycle officially OVER
Sleeps role in strength output and recovery
Physical capability vs physical preparedness
Melatonin dosing sensitivity
Date night series
Training Program Design
Non-calendar week training rotation
Favorite exercises for Rear Delts
“What are your thoughts on the benefits of isolation movements for beginners, as a means to connect mind to muscle?”