Eat Train Prosper

Rapid Fire Nutrition, Training, Lifestyle Q&A | ETP#42

November 02, 2021 Aaron Straker | Bryan Boorstein
Eat Train Prosper
Rapid Fire Nutrition, Training, Lifestyle Q&A | ETP#42
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Today we take a new approach to an Instagram Q&A episode and instead of picking and choosing we answered ALL SUBMITTED QUESTIONS. 23 questions to be precise. We sectioned off the questions into first nutrition related questions, then training related questions, and finally lifestyle related questions. Thank you to all of you guys who submitted your questions for this weeks episode and thank you for listening! ✌️

Nutrition Questions: 

  1. Does a higher fat macro split tend to favor a “lifestyle lean” Aesthetic, or is this anecdotal?
  2. Is it possible to go too slow in a building phase? I.E. 100 cal increase every 3 weeks versus every week? 
  3. Sucralose. Avoid or don’t worry? 
  4. Been on a cut to lean out. Is it bad to be on a cut for too long? 
  5. How long should cuts and bulks be? Until you hit goals, or what is the recommendation? 
  6. Nutrition and lifestyle tips for a college student who doesn’t wanna “miss out?” 

Training Questions: 

  1. Studies or new findings that have changed the way you train and program?
  2. On days with a lengthened overload squat, would you prefer lengthened or short overload leg extension as secondary movement. 
  3. If young training age, will “ME” (muscular endurance) training translate to overall/max strength. If so, how long? 
  4. Do you find for yourself and clients, that training 6 out of 7 days is too much? 
  5. Thoughts on Jeff Nippard style full body training 5x/week?
  6. Thoughts on single set to failure training? 
  7. Best Pull-up progression? Bands, negatives? 
  8. Resources we recommend for coaches wanting to expand training knowledge? 
  9. Best way to gauge RIR if new to this type of training? 
  10. Do we recommend warming up and stretching before, or just starting with light weight for first movement? (second part; stretch before or after training?) 
  11. Best rep range for novice? 
  12. Would you ever use eccentric-only training? Maybe at the end of a set? 
  13. How do you gauge weights for backoff set on primary lift? 

Lifestyle Questions: 

  1. I’m getting adequate total sleep, but very little DEEP sleep. Thoughts/tips/effects?
  2. Best tips for a good night sleep? 
  3. Best recovery protocols? Foam roll, sauna, muscle stim? Others?
  4. How do you stay MOTIVATED to train solo? 

Nutrition Coaching with Aaron ⬇️
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https://strakernutritionco.com/macronutrient-reporting-check-in-template/

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[aaron_straker]:

Happy Tuesday. Everyone welcom back to another episode of each train. Prosper today is a rapid fire. q, and a episode that Brian and I have goingne on. Brian Got a bunch of really really cool questions. I would, even maybe bombarded with questions from a little inigram, quue in a box, So before you can jump into all these questions, Brian. What's latest with you?

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, it's interesting about the that q and a boox. Huh, because we, uh, we were just talking before a show and I put up one originally to get questions a couple of days prior and I literally only got five questions and every single question was a nutrition one, which just seems crazy from like you know what I do and what you do, and that all these nutrition questions would comeing into me. So then I put up another box for for training questions, and I got like twenty five of them or something crazy like that. So um, so for whatever reason, that's the way the Internets were working. And uh, now we have a cool mix of nutrition questions and training questions and a couple of lifestyle questions too. So uh, we'll get into that in a minute. but uh, what is going on with me is that I'm in week three of my strength, Ph, uh, it's going great. I decided to join a local crossfitit gym. Uh, it's actually crosst Sitas, which anyone that's uh, in the Crosset community would know that that is the gym owned by the new owner of Crossfit, the new C. e. o. Um. so I attend that gym, which is kind of cool and I know that he has Uh like frooning and a bunch of the the kind of name faceaces of Uh cross Fiit, come by the gym a couple of times a year and they have events there and I think last time they actually hiked situs the mountain. Um. so there's always like kind of cool stuff happening there and it's like a really big, really nicely, well done, Uh gym. so um, I'm excited to do my strength work there. It was really nice yesterday for my first session to be able to squat without the constraints of my teeny home gym. Um, kind of suffocating me. Uh, so I had tons of space, you know, light coming through the windows. There was a crossfit class going on that I could like watch people between sets. and uh it was cool. It was just a great experience overall. Um. the strength cycle going well. So far all the lifts are going up. I pulled a four fifty five deadlift single at like an r. p. E seven yesterday and that was probably like the easiest four fifty five I've ever pulled. So that was a good sign and uh, squatting's going well too, just kind of progressing along, adding five pounds a week, and Um dumbbell pressing, actually, Cr. So this is really interesting 'cause I know you have been doing the cast style uh, pressing, where the elbows kind of stay in and the bisup comes across and a ducks across the body right. So I kind of like half ass, tried to do that last cycle like months ago, but my ego would always get in the way, and when the weights would get heavy, I would hit a sticking point kind of just above or right before lockout, and my my elbow would turn out so I wasn't able to keep kind of driving across the body. It kinda would get to about here and then the elbow would turn out and I would finish, you know, with the help of my interior. Delts. Um, so this cycle, given that it's a strength cycle in, my goal is to stay like you know, five reps Shi a failure or whatever, on every set. I figured it'd be a perfect time to actually implement that and force myself to work through it and not just get like side tracked, 'cause my ego's hurt that I'm not doing the hundreds any morere. Um, so I started with the eighty fives, and it was super awkward at first. The first week I only get hit four sets of five, and I stopped after four sets. Because, um, the rep began to slow. That's kind of what I'm trying to avoid is uh, concentric speed slowing. So my, my final wrap of that fores sett slowed and I was like Okay, four set to five. That's all I can do. And now, um, two weeks after that I hit six sets of

[aaron_straker]:

S.

[bryan_boorstein]:

six with the same weight and there was no slowing. So I've added you know two sets and added a bunch of wraps, Uh thirty six total reps instead of twenty total reps. So that's a. That's a huge increase and I'm feeling much more confident with that movement pattern. Cass told me that it would adapt really quickly if I just like started doing it and stopped giving in. And uh, so I'm really glad that I gave that a shot and I know that you've kind of been experiencing a lot of the same adaptations as you've become Uh, more technically proficient at that movement style.

[aaron_straker]:

Yes for me. Interestingly enough, it just feels better.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, no, I would agree with that, too.

[aaron_straker]:

It feel. it feels a lot safer and natural for me. So it was kind of an easy, easy

[bryan_boorstein]:

M.

[aaron_straker]:

shift. and yeah, kind of same thing. One of the. It's really nice when you when you switch Because the neural adaptation like it is a big,

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

kind of an asterisk. So like the weights are going up, but it's a. It's a movement. I haven't performed in this capacity consistently for like so I know', kind of artificial Ga,

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

not trues, but it is still motivating per se To be okay. I squeeze out an extra rep this week, type of thing, so it is pretty

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

cool.

[bryan_boorstein]:

no, for sure, when I, um, when the reps get hard and it's not like you know a rep speed is slowing, but you can just kind of feel what's happening as the reps get harder, Um throughout And it's crazy because when I would begin to do hard reps in my elbow would turn out, it would be like the failure was almost like a stability failure. It would be like is my. Is my delt going to hold on long enough for me to lock this wrap out, But this way when fatigue is happening, it's literally happening. like in the chests like you can feel the chest moving the weight and the aduction of the chest is what's ascending. the dumbbells. so to speak, Um, So so that's cool. And then one other thought I just had on this is when I was up at N one talking a cas. I originally demod it to him in the way that I was performing it on a on a low incline, and he was like well, the way that your body is made up, Uh, in your torso position in your chest. Um, you can't really do Anyc press in this manner, because what happens is you get to about three quarters the way up, and the dubell is is too high over your face at this point, so you're no longer actually staying in the active range of the chest, So he put me down onto a flat bench and he was like, See how when you get to the top of the Wp, Now that the dubell is still over the top of your chest and not over your face, Um, and so that was really interesting to me, too. Because I had always, I've always preferred incline pressing, and I wonder if that's just because it played into my interior delt dominance. Um, and I never really let my chest fully do it. so um, all, very interesting. And then I even wonder if like a slight decline would put me into even a better position. that would allow me to kind of train across the the fibre length of of where the packs actually run. Um, but whether that matters, I don't exactly know either. So all, very interesting. and uh, I know you have your uh, your n one trip booked for Uh for December, so that should be super super hyped dued. I'm glad to hear. I, I'm excited to hear all about that.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, so uh, I snuck into that the last uh. practical the year after that, a couple of episodes back, you said it was sold out and I like, kind of

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yep.

[aaron_straker]:

had a little shit fit. Um, so I'm goingne Jenny's coming to, actually, which is pretty cool.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Oh sweet.

[aaron_straker]:

And then we actually decided. So it's It's kind of funny when we travel. We almost like exclusively stay in an air B Beas, because I want a kitchen type of deal, but this time

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

we actually there was a. There is a hotel that's like a few minutes walking distance to U and the N. one h. Hu. and you're like, You know what what state? The hotel? It's going to be a little bit of an extended trip and we're going to like put together. not necesarily a protocol, but a like a game plan for clients when traveling in hotels for like eating. So we're like Okay. This

[bryan_boorstein]:

nice.

[aaron_straker]:

is what we're going to. We're going to get to the grocery store, or we have a, a mini fridge and A and a microwave. Like, wow, what are we going to figure out so kind of using it as I mean. It's obviously a work trip, but in an an additional layer of like, Okay, What meals can we do with just a microwave to put together better options for our clients too?

[bryan_boorstein]:

it's a double business expense.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. I'm very very excited about that. Um, and then what else? for me? moving next week to Scotsdale, Arizona. It is officially winter here in

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

Uh, Utah. The candyans have like a bunch of snow, and the roads are closed and stuff like that, or like going with like tino chain chains and stuff. So it is weather's not great, so we are uh, heading out next week, which is the plan Right on November fourth, we leave. gonna spend like three to four months in Scottsdale, So any listeners out there if you are Scottsdale Phoix area, Uh, hit me up. I love to lift some weights. Maybe get some coffee going on a hike or something like that, Um that. It'll be coming very soon. Im about almost halfway through my gut protocol. Not quite. uh. I would say things are still hit or miss right now. Uh, some days I still do get kind of gassy. It is interesting to me trying to kind of pinpoint Uh, specifically what it is 'cause we, my days are very very similar. A lot of the same foods and stuff. So it is, I think it might be certain volumes of certain types at certain points of the day relation to how quickly I put things you know in in in my stomach or in my G. I. I guess I should say relative to the previous feeding sort of thing. So still just uh, cruising along there and then kind of lost updates. I'm getting a Dexas scan before we leave the day before. When I got the one back in August, I bought two 'cause it was like half the second price. I was like, okay, whatever, I'll come back before you leave, so I'll go get that done and I'm gonna get some um, sex hormone labroric as well. so my coach has been asking just because we've stayed much leaner than kind of thought would be possible. Uh, just to make sure that I'm not like down regulated thyroid, down, regulated total free test, osterone, you know, sex hormone binding, globul and stuff, so I'm really interested in that too, 'cause this is a first for me personally to be this lean at this amount of calories stuff, so it kind of just to me goes. Uh, I'll often say with clients like it's a long game, right this? this nutrition physiqu thing, it's a. It's a long game and it, it only continues to be, become more and more true for myself. Like the longer I do it, the more times I go through that, like you know, gaining and then dieting process. I never put on as much body fat on the way back up. I'm significantly leaner now In my, you know, I'm approaching my mid thirties here than I was well at, you know, In my twenties and stuff like that, I truly do believe I have more muscle mass. I actually found an old picture of Ussprian that I've been meeting to post. I screen outot it. I think it's from my twenty thirteen, twenty fourteen, and it's U and I standing right next to each other and we both have our shirts off, which is like kind of odd for that time period for myself. Um, so it'll be a pretty cool thing, but I mean we both definitely look much better now and

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

I even though I think this picture's literally like eight years ago, Um, so it is pretty cool to see

[bryan_boorstein]:

you know, we also have that one of the whole, like cross, P. B team, like standing in a line with like Kuchan and all the girls

[aaron_straker]:

Mhm.

[bryan_boorstein]:

and stuff, too. That one's dope, but I think that one's done up so much by Hammer that I think it doesn't represent like our physiques necessarily in their natural state.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, it's not like a. like A. it's like a. It's It's a highlight like that. Wass like a highlight. you know. Yeah, exactly.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, yeah, not candid. Yeah, cool. Do you have anything else?

[aaron_straker]:

uh. Last thing Ill say is like my training's going really well. I'm really enjoying it. I'm feeling strong, which is cool because I'm like small and you know lean and it that you generally don't kind of correlate the two. but I'm adding you know reps each week. wait each week. I'm really liking the d. d P. progression style. Um, like last week I had a session where I just could feel it wasn't going to be great and I just reduced everything and stayed in my same rep ranges, and just like you know, took it, I didn't take it as like a negative like I normally would have. Um, Yeah, it's just really wild. You know, still stacking weight on and videoing myself more more, which I'm finding is becoming more and more important because there's there's a diotomy between how you feel and a set often in what it looks

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

like on video, so I put up my. My story Maybe was like a week ago. I added almost at twenty pounds in a single hack squat session because I watch the first set and

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yep,

[aaron_straker]:

whoa. That's moving way too fast, and I literally had to just keep putting more weight on And that was. I mean, I'm now up like thirty pounds from what I was doing for same reps just because I video a couple sets and it was like Oh shit, those are

[bryan_boorstein]:

mhm.

[aaron_straker]:

moving really fast So it's just the more da you have. It's always going to help you make better decisions.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, I would say my phone is probably filled with about ninety percent of workout videos for mecause. I actually do film every work set I do like. occasionally. I'll film a warm upset if it's like a dead lift and I just want to make sure that like you know, my back position is good or whatever, but um, I literally film every work that I do, even of the like six sets of six of of press that I was doing that I referenced earlier. I filmed four of those justcause. I was like Okay, I want to see how my elbow angle looks like from from this side and from that side from above, and like just to kind of get like different perspectives of what it looks like from different angles And I think that I learned something you know. Each time I look at that

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah,

[bryan_boorstein]:

cool. Well, I have a couple more small updates and then we'll jump into the q and a um. Finally, now, uh, one day away from four weeks in, I feel like my scrotum is recovered, so it was a significantly longer experienced recovery than than I have wanted and expected. I was a bit of a mind fuck to be honest, but um, the other day two days ago I was outgoing for a walk and I was like Wow, I feel great. like other theres. there's no pain. There's no like you know awareness around it. so I was like, let me start jogging and just see if it feels okay. You know, I did a slow jog for like two hundred meters and that felt fine, so I walked a little more. Then I did like a hard jog for two hundred meters and that felt fine And then I did a sprint for two hundred meters and I was kind of like Ooh. I feel something like. you know, definitely like I'm aware, but it wasn't like painful. so um, well, I wouldn't say that I'm like a hundred percent healed. I'm at least able to run and jump and like for the most part of my life and I think that it is healing. I mean if I still come back four weeks from now and say Yep, still hurts if I sprint like. I think we're gonna. we'nna have a problem, but I'm optimistic now that the healing has begun, and uh and I should be good to go. Um. beyond that. I have a uh, much better grasp on my nutrition situation now, uh, my body weight is stable at one ninety, Like I mentioned last episode. We're at one ninety again this week. It's nice having. Uh, I know of Kim as an accountability partner. So she. we have booked Kim and I decided, just literally off the cuff of our sleeve, like we were talking to another couple. That was like you know the best thing to do in the winter with y little kids is go to an all inclusive resort and they have, like you know, these child care areas that are open from like six a M to nine p M. so you can just drop them there whenever you want free time. So we looked into it like literally. This all came together this week and we booked a four night five day stay in Uh Cancun, at an all inclusive resort for January. So Kim is now uh, on this mission to get in shape for for her bikini and in Cancun, And it's It's nice for me that we both kind of have each other as these accountability partners. and Uh, we're taking an approach with M. Sunday through Thursday being are are like you know, really dialed in like no added sugars type thing, and then Friday night and Saturday, we can kind of like eat out and maybe have a dessert or something like that, and then when Sunday rolls around, we're going to get back on the accountability train and we'll see how that works out because that allows us to still have like a date night and stuff like,

[aaron_straker]:

just mean you're going to uh hang up your baking apron for for a couple of months

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, I'm not going to bake, except on the weekends, maybe like a Saturday evening, something ba, and then get back on the train. On on Sunday, so all good stuff? I'm excited about our trip. I'm excited about. you know, the way I feel eating better. and um, that's pretty much it on my updates.

[aaron_straker]:

cool. I want to dig in. Uh, want me to kick this first one over to you.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Uh, how about I ask you some of these nutrition ones

[aaron_straker]:

Okay, that's fine.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Because I at least think the first question. like I kind of looked at it. I was like I don't know. Like so I'm wondering if you have thoughts on this. Does a higher fat macro split tend to favor a lifestyle lean aesthetic? or is this anecdotal

[aaron_straker]:

so I would say this is anecdotal. Um, lifestyle lean is a hard. It's incredibly subjective. Of course. I don't mean that in a negative manner, but I mean someone could consider like lifestyle in like eighteen percent body fat. You know, I would consider lifestyle lean like eleven for me personally, maybe twelve. because uh, it, just this is, that's my lifestyle. you know what I mean. I'm a nutrition coach of course, so I, it depends. I hate using that, but it it really does. I think you could go either way as long as you have kind of uh, constraints that allow you to exist within Th those you know, um constraints. I guess I should say without too much uh, uh, deviation, what I will add is con. You know, previously almost exclusively I had fallen followed a higher carbohydrate approach, but right now I'm kind of being for the first time seeing the opposite where I am following a higher fat approach. I wish I had the numbers. I. I meant to write him down, but I'm doing like right now. My carb's on a training day. Only two twenty, right, pretty low. Specific. believe for the scut protocol, my facts are at like one thirty. I think yeah, one thirty and then one thirty five on my rest days. So it is a pretty good. I'm probably a balance, if not a little bit higher. fat. um, I can't think of. I can't do those numbers off the top of my head. I'm sorry, but I'd say it is mostly anecdotal. There are certain things that could influence it, and this could shift with changes in your physiology. Let's say you, other aspects of your lifestyle. your sleep stress, et cetera begin to improve your insulin sensitivity. Over time, you might find that you can now tolerate more carbohydrate because of those kind of external factors. So it is anecdotal. There are factors that can shift Um back and forth, but I would say it's more anecdotal than anything.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, my opinion on it would be that total calorie intake is going to move the needle more as far as whether you remain lean or not, and it doesn'tly matter the fat in the carb. Um, personally, I've gone through periods of time where I actually was on like a thirty, three, thirty three, thirty three split, And so it ended up being like on a three thousand calorie intake. That's like two fifty protein, two fifty carbs, and like a hundred and twenty fat or something like that. Um, and that was fine. Like I, I enjoyed it. I don't think that it allowed me to do the Perry workout thing, which I really actually do like. And so that's one drawback. I guess to having a higher fat intake is. Uh. it kind of messes up your ability to carbon protein around. Uh, the training sessions, Um, cool. Next question. Is it possible to go too slow in a building phase? I eat a hundred calorie increase every three weeks versus every week.

[aaron_straker]:

It is possible to go too slow. It's possible to go too fast. If you're going too slow, you're not your weight's not changing. That would be the the most obvious indicator.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm.

[aaron_straker]:

I would say, follow your body weight trends. More importantly than following. I'm increasing x every x weeks. So pick a number and kind of scoot that along until you start getting Um. A. A trend that is positive for your weights or average thema over like a seven day moving average is the best in my opinion, and see, and that is what I would recommend for that.

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah, yeah, I mean, if you're increasing a hundred Cs every three weeks, like over the course of fifteen weeks, you're going to be eating five hundred calories more, which is, I think relatively significant. This is a female asking the question as well for whatever it's worth, So I think a five hundred calary increase over a couple of months is is a significant increase. so I don't think a hundred every three weeks is too slow. but you definitely could go too slower. You could go too fast. For sure.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, and my, I would recommend slower is better, Um, and

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

also just know that like a hundred calories is it depends on your consistency and adherence, too right. because if you're

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

off by a little bit in either direction, you know over a handful of days like that's a wash. pretty much.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

so. Um, just know that too.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, when you're increasing by small margins, there definitely is more room for air. like

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah,

[bryan_boorstein]:

yet being off by twenty calories Is you know? a much bigger percentage of your increase? Um, okay, er, and what? your thoughts on sucroose? Avoid it, or don't worry about it.

[aaron_straker]:

this is really cool be cause. I actually did a big deep dive on this last week. Um, depends on your digestion, so if you are someone who's gassy like myself. Um, if you look at the research, Uh, the the most kind of uh, up to date we have on it is in people who have some digestive intolerances, or not super strong digestion, as is sucrolos, can give you a little bit more Um. gasiness, as opposed to like Steviia, Monk, fruit extract, or even like you know, table sugar. Is that

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

what they call it table sugar, table salt,

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

table sugar. Whatever you know what I'm saying, regular

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yes, the regular sugar.

[aaron_straker]:

sugar. if you're someone who like doesn't have like gas or any kind of of g, I type stuff and you have a really really like solid type stomach amusing like air by G. I mean, I don't think it's it's water under the bridge. I don't think it's worth you know of avoiding or anything like that, but if you are someone who gets like gassi or whatever it might behove you to uh, try temporarily to move from like a sucroose based protein powder to a steviia base and just see.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, I, uh, personally, don't have issues with sucrolose, but what I do notice is that if I don't use it for a while and then I do use it again, I hold water for a number of days afterwards. Like literally, the scale can jump three pounds, four pounds, with no other changes in the diet. Aside from just you know, now I've consumed a quest bar and something else was sucrulos and I don't usually do that. so that's that's interesting. but as far as like health and long term stuff, like the science hasn't shown it to be dangerous. Like all the sweeteners are not worth worrying about unless you are literally drinking like a hundred liters of coke, die coke every day.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, I think from a from a health standpoint there are no like Western medical type adverse health risks if you are someone who has digestive issues. That is where it will show up first,

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, so these next two questions are very related. I actually think they may be from the same person, so I'm going to slam them together into one. Been on a cut to lean out. Is it bad to be on a cup for too long? I think the quick answer there is. Yes. The second part of the question is how long should cuts in balks be till you hit your goals Or what is the recommendation?

[aaron_straker]:

so I'll answer them separately. So if you've been on a cut to lean out, is it bad to be on a cup for too long? It can't. well, Yes, it depends relative on your definition of bad. What generally happens is people say they're on a cut, but then they're like. Oh, well, I have a bachelor party and then I took this week off and then I did these other things, so like you're not on a deficit. you're just going like your yo of dieting is essentially what you're doing. Um, so that is when it gets to be like too long. Like if if we talk about your natural body bedting body building competitors, they'll die for like eight months. Um, they may have you know, re feeds and stuff like that, but they are actively dieting so just make sure that you are setting proper constraints on what you're saying. What you're doing depends on how much weight you want to lose, Right if you're like, Hey, I'm two hundred and seventy pounds and I want to be two hundred pounds. That might be pretty pretty long. You would benefit from having diets et cetera, but if you're like Hey, I'm you know. fifteen percent body fat. want to be eleven percent That need to lose eighteen pounds. You can die for twenty weeks, but I don't see anything really wrong with that. Uh, So long as you do your due diligence and go through recovery, diet and stuff afterward, Um, moving into the second part. How long should cuts and bulks be? it depends I. I. I am sorry for using that word, but it really really does

[bryan_boorstein]:

You have no contacts. I mean you,

[aaron_straker]:

you have. Yeah, so I don't really see any benefit to doing either for less than like six weeks, unless you're like mini cutting for something. Uh, but you're already obviously very well versed there. personally, I think pushing like a. like a bulker, A. A gaining what I like to to refer to it as Um, until you've had like significant movement or changes right if you, if you bulk or gain and you're up like four pounds And it's been five weeks and you're gonna cut like you're just going to look exactly like you did when you started and you just basically wasted the last four weeks of gaining in five. six weeks of dieting to just end up where you were when you started, type of deal. So I recommend taking carving the time out, making them longer, Um, relative to your goal, but I would say I lean more towards. Let's hit your goals and then map out how long is an an appropriate time line for us to do so.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, I pretty much agree with all of that. Um, I feel like even if you're doing the yoo dieting thing or like you have the bachelor party in the birthday, So like every know week or two, you're taking a couple of days off of the diet, I don't even know that that necessarily extends your runway like that much longer, because I don't know that a couple days here and there is long enough to really reset, like grow and wepon stuff, and like, really get hormone production back into like, uh, more of an anabolic state like I, I feel like it's like you know the. House is on fire and you're just like throwing one or two buckets on and walking away and hoping that like that helps versus like actually really putting the fire out. So for whatever that's worth,

[aaron_straker]:

Not so much from like a gralln in Lepton perspective, but in terms of like okay, we've been dieting for three weeks, right you down three pounds. You go on a bachelor party. You come back up five pounds And

[bryan_boorstein]:

M

[aaron_straker]:

we're kind of like starting over type of

[bryan_boorstein]:

right,

[aaron_straker]:

for someone like yourself, Brian, Because you've invested so much time in drops in in that bucket. Those things will shift much more quickly, but for your average, like you know, Dieter, that's just not the case. You know, I've clients who come back from something and then there and there up, and it takes us another three weeks just to get back to where they were before the wedding or something like that.

[bryan_boorstein]:

mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

So now you know we've been effectively seven weeks of diet and were only back to where we were at week three, type of deal.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm

[aaron_straker]:

So I'd say for your majority gent pop person, the latter is much more of a realistic scenario. Unfortunately,

[bryan_boorstein]:

is what it is. You make the best

[aaron_straker]:

Mhm,

[bryan_boorstein]:

of it cool. So the last nutrition question we have is is interesting and I think there's two ways you could look at it because it's not super specif. It says, nutrition and lifestyle tips for a college student who doesn't want to miss out. My question is do you not want to miss out on parting and hanging out with girls or do you not want to miss out on making gains because I think that you could take that question in either direction.

[aaron_straker]:

I'm going to take it from the former, right, um, this one. This is a really really cool question. I think I would have avoid trying to diet much. I would have. I would spend the majority of those years focusing on building muscle. You're young. Still, you should have hormones in a really good position. Hopefully still, even though you're drinking alcohol in your sleep is shit, and all that other type of like college stuff. But dieting in my you know opinion, where is only going to to preact from that, so I would avoid trying to stay too lean. I'd say maybe fifteen to twenty percent body fat. I'd say in college, I probably stayed around twenty percent mostly and I lifted five days per week. you know, I. I stillole ate protein and stuff like that, but I I dran a lot. you know. I fortunately didn't do much drinking like my, you know, Monday through Wednesday type of deal, but uh, definitely on the weekends, you know a lot. Um, I would say, trying to just focus more on getting strong and building muscle as opposed to dieting, would probably be the best of both worlds.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, I fully agree. Actually, our college experiences based on that like three sentences you just put together were like identical. I, I pretty much dra hard like Thursdayriday, Saturday, sometimes Sunday, and then lifted five days a week. Like no questions asked that even wake up Friday morning hung over and you know, go to the gym and flip fops and do arms, so you just kind of hit your. If you hit your protein goals, you make sure you're not in a deficit. So you' So you're in a surplus with sufficient protein and you your lifting weights four or five days a week. You should be able to go out and have fun and enjoy everything and still make progress because you're young and you're just astro is flowing and all these things. Um. and then, as far as you know, ultimately, you don't want to go four years and never be able to be like. I wonder if Likeick I actually look good under here or not. Um. So what I would usually do is you know college ends pretty early, Uh, like in May, or something like that right, like it ends way earlier than high schools do. So I would usually start Uh, like a six week, you know, miniotut like a pretty aggressive miniut right after the year ended when I was home and I was like living with my parents again and there was uh, really nothing to do except lift weights and eat homem food. And uh, and I would start running and like shit like that, and and uh, and and over six weeks I would drop you know twelve pounds and I would go on a beach trips and stuff over the summer, and I I'd look good, and then you know school would start again and I'd go back to being fifteen to twenty percent fluffy. So Um, that worked out pretty well and I think that would probably be the way I'd approach it.

[aaron_straker]:

I, I personally't do that because I just on my radar, but I agree that I think that's a really viable approach.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, cool. well, now we're uh, moving into a bunch of training questions.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeps. I will read these ones for you,

[bryan_boorstein]:

Y.

[aaron_straker]:

studies or new findings that have changed the way you train and program

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, I love this question. Um, I think the very obvious answer is the length and overload stuff. I mean, we've harped on this now for probably ten or twelve episodes at least, And um, they've just this. The studies are are very obvious at this point that the the initial range of motion of a lift, the part that goes from the stretched position to get the weight moving is the most beneficial part, and that the part where you actually cantract the muscle is the least important part. Um, so that's definitely changed the way I trained. you know, adding partials in the length and position after Uh, reaching failure on a short range overload movement. and then I think the other thing is, you know a couple of years ago we had this obsession in the evidence Ba space with volume. It was like volumes. Everything you know. there was the Brad Shownfel meta analysis and there was the study that like forty five sets was better than twenty seven cents, which was better than nine sets. And like all these things, and I feel like now in the last year or two were finally like coming back to center and were realizing like Hey, you know, effort is important and execution is important and not all volume is created equal, like one person can do if their bench press max is three hundred pounds and they just did ho sets of a hundred and thirty five pounds for ten. You could do a hundred sets of a hundred and thirty five for ten, and that's volume's going to be very ineffective because it's forty percent of your max or whatever it is, and you're not even getting close to failure in those sets of ten, so not all volume is created equal. There's a volume effort ratio, so I think that's important that the harder you work, the less volume you do, and the less hard you want to work, the more volume you can do. And I would say those are the two biggest takeaways recently. For me,

[aaron_straker]:

the the way you phrase. that part is fantastic. Not all volume is createdqual and this is something I am beginning to learn more and more about than just trying to become as efficient as possible with each set. So, yeah, well,

[bryan_boorstein]:

cool.

[aaron_straker]:

I'm going to fop in answer, or as this, number three and them will pop back the number two be cause it really relative

[bryan_boorstein]:

okay, yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

on days with a lengthened overload squat. Would you prefer a lengthened or short overload leg extension as a secondary movement?

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah, so for the listeners essentally, what they're asking is like. Since most squat movements, pretty much all swaat movements are overloaded in the length and position, like the hardest point is going to be the bottom or the bottom middle of the rep. Assuming you're doing a squat as your primary lift, what would be the best use of the leg extension exercise? Would you want to overload it lengthened or overload it shortened? And I, actually, it's funny to to hear this question because uh, it was something I really thought about a lot in my last cycle as I was going through my diet and I had my my days split up and stuff, so I had one leg day. Uh, where I did the Uh legg extension short, and and I, I put that on. Well, actually it, it doesn't matter 'cause I had a squat pattern on both days, but I think the answer to this question is that the leg extension shortened is probably better with the length anded overload squat. so that you get a little bit of both. Um, what I did in my my cycle To go back to that is that I had one day where I did leg extension shortened overload, and then I moved to a pendulum, which was uh or no. I moved to the hack on the day it was short overload, I moved to the hack because that's a lengthened overload, and the day that I did leggytension with a lengthened overload, I went to the pendulum, but I had it reverse banded so that it was harder in the top range of motion. Um, so I think that if you can figure out a way to create a squat pattern movement that isn't as lengthened overload, then that would be a good day to put a lengthen overload leg extension on so that you kind of get the stimuluss from both sides

[aaron_straker]:

One thing, I want to kind of ask you clarify. So with your leg extension machine at home and your home gym, you can change the overload position correct based on.

[bryan_boorstein]:

correct. Yes,

[aaron_straker]:

Can you explain that a little bit? because like an a gym, I was saying nine out of ten you unable to do that correct?

[bryan_boorstein]:

correct, ya. yeah, Um, but you know it's interesting because the the valor leg extension leg cro machine, the Titan, and the one I have, which is x Mark. They're all basically the same Like the. the design is the same. There's a few little things that are different here and there, but the cool thing about all these machines is their cam based, so Um, what that means is that there's this little like pan at the bottom that you put in and the the the cam with the weight on it. The lever arm rotates around this pin, so if there's you can use. Oh man, it's really hard to explain. Um, Basically, if you put a different size plate on the pin, it changes your resistance curve. So, if you put in no plates on the pin and you just let the machine act as it naturally would, in its natural state, it's going to be severely shortened overload there's going to be almost no resistance at the bottom of the wrap. And then if you do something like, put a twenty five pound plate on like a pretty big one, but not as big as like a thirty five or forty five, right, A twenty five makes it pretty lengthened overload. Um, it's about as lengthened as you can get with this machine. Without. if I went more lengthened, there would be no resistance at the top. Um, so it would be all at the bottom. But then the top. you know you would get to the top and it would just it would be like a feather and it would almost try to rotate over the opposite way Like it would be like you would kick the leg extension machine over, and the cam would rotate over the wrong way. Um, so I operate between having none if I want short overload all the way up to like a twenty five if I want like a mid Ranger length and overload.

[aaron_straker]:

Last kind of little follow question. There would you say? the majority of your general jim's leg extension machines are shortened overload or lengthened overload.

[bryan_boorstein]:

You know, I always thought they were shortened overload. And then I, I heard Cass say on a q and A, the other day that he thinks that most of the Um Legg Ecension machines in Gyems are more midrangeer length and overload. Um, So I think that it it. It depends on the machine, but one way that you can really quickly find out is Uh, when you finish a set to failure, do a couple partial reps. And if you can barely even get that thing to move a quarter of the range of motion on your first partial rep, then it's probably lengthened overload. And if you can get it, you know three quarters of the way and then you know three fifths of the way and then two fits of the way, and you can basically just keep like chipping away at range of motion, Then it's probably overloaded in the shortened position.

[aaron_straker]:

One thing, I, the last thing I will add there, and please don't quote me on this, I'm fairly certain, but not a hundred percent, depending on the shape of the cam of the machine. So if it's like a perfect circle, it is probably a very even resistance curve. If it is more like egg shaped or lopsided in some way, then you' probably going to be overloaded in one or the other more a an equal resistance curve.

[bryan_boorstein]:

That's interesting. I never knew that and I, I think honestly, to be truthful, I' probably only used three or four different leg extension machines at you know gyms in my life, because I was in crossvit and then I was in a gym for a short amount of time, and then I've been training at home, so I don't have a ton of experience with them.

[aaron_straker]:

Make okay. So, next question you, if if we have a young training age, will M E, muscular endurance training translate to overall max strength? If so, for how long

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yup, uh, you skipped question too as well, so we need to go back to that one After this.

[aaron_straker]:

said I Going to go? three? come back to and I just did not. I'm sorry. we will come back to number two.

[bryan_boorstein]:

No, you're cool your coal. Um, so if you have a young training age, the thing is like there's actually a study. This is wild because there's actually a study that they took untrained people that were sedentary, So not even like people that like live a relatively active life, But just don't lift weights. These are like sedentary people and they started having them run. So one group started to run and the other groups started to lift weights, and they got the same muscular gains at the end of whatever. This period was just from running because they were sedentary and like literally doing anything, was going to build muscle in their body. I. I believe these adaptations you know are a very, very short term. I don't know how long the study was, but I couldn't imagine that this lasted longer than four or five, six weeks at most. Um. so so yes, in in the early stages anything works. I can't give you an exact number of how long this is going to work for. Um, but I can say that training for muscular endurance, like with weights, is more specific to getting strong than running is. so your runway is going to be extended by training with weights at all. even if you're doing sets of thirty to forty, and that's going to be more productive than running is. Then if you did set a twenty, then that would be more productive than doing sets of thirty to forty if you're looking for translation to strength and maxes. But ultimately, if you can follow my path, here is we're working towards specificity, and as training age increases, specificity must increase. so Um for somebody like Aaron or myself, If we're doing sets of ten to fifteen, I would expect zero increase in my overall max, Like, maybe I would get better at. I would get stronger at performing sets of ten to fifteen, because that's what. I'm performing it specific to that, but I wouldn't expect any transfer from doing a set of ten to my one rat max. If I want to improve my one rat, Max, I need to be doing sets of one, two, three, four, maybe five reps, and they need to be within. you know. x amount of reps of failure, et cetera et cetera, So Um, as your training age increases, you need to get more specific and that's the best answer I can give you.

[aaron_straker]:

I don't have anything to do there. Okay, back to question too, Do you find for yourself and clients that training six out of seven days is too much

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, short answer. Yes, um, I mean, I think there are absolutely ways that you can do it. Um, because frequency is just a way to split volume. So if we took the same amount of volume that I'm doing on a three day program, like right now, in my strength cycle, I'm doing a three day a week full body streng cycle. I actually had a few moments considering and I actually think about this. Every every session I do, I get through my squats and dead list and I'm like man. I should just do the upper body stuff tomorrow like I, I don't need to do this right now and then. The problem with that is that, then okay, I do you know squots and deads on Monday? I do upper body on Tuesday That I'm back to doing legs on Wednesday, the upper body, Thursday and legs on Friday, upper body Saturday. Well, okay, the volume's the same, but for me it essentially comes down to a psychology thing, because I really don't like training six days a week. I lose motivation to train. I stop enjoying it. Um, and I would much rather spend two hours three days a week than one hour six days a week. Um, that's my preference. If looking at what is optimal for hpertrophy, I would say that three is probably not optimal because you need to do a certain amount of volume and it would be tough to fit all that volume into three days, which I think three days is much more conducive to a strength cycle like I'm doing, because the volume is significantly lower. If I was doing a hypertphy phase, it would have at least four or five. It would have four or five days of training a week. Be cause. That's just what I need to split my volume and not feel like I'm burning out and losing desire to train.

[aaron_straker]:

awesome. So for my clients, I would say a majority. Yes, probably too much relative to their lifestyle and their goals for me, kind of the complete opposite of Briryan, so I would rather go to the gym six days per week for like fifty minutes to an hour, then three days per week for two hours, because I know at about the like hour and twenty hour and thirty mark, my desire to train drops off pretty significantly, so like for instance, right now I'm only training four days per week, but at their longer sessions and oftentimes like nine, and have ten times when it comes around to. Like that that second to last and last exercise like I, straight up do not want to be there. Um. and I kind of like the. the. I really really like push pull legs. That's my favorite train. Split and then you run that you know, push pull legs off. push pull leggs. Um, I would say when I do run that I generally end up training around six days every eight days, six sessions every eight days, so not you know, quite six out of seven, but that is by far my favorite and I think what's really the the best way to answer it is what your preference comes down to you. Because we have like Brian and myself right, kind of polar opposites. Brian prefers three days for two hours, and I prefer like six days for one hour, so it really comes down to like preference. I think.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, I think psychology really is the number one underlying piece here. Physiologically it becomes relevant if like you know, getting to an hour and a half and year session and then you're actually seeing performance decorment And it's not like just your mind quitting on you, but like physiologically you're just not getting the output anymore. Um, but I think for most people it's going to be psychological in preference, and then really quick. I want touch on the pushpoll legs thing because that's also one of my favorite splits, but I really like to do it with pushpoll rest legs rest, so that it's three sessions over five days and then repeat. Um, So I think that volume ends up being slightly lower than yours because I'm three out of five. or is you're six out of eight? Um, but again, I guess personal preference is interesting.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, the last little bit, I will add there is if you are like dieting or something like that, a recovery capacity could become a little bit

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

of a concern there. So

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yep,

[aaron_straker]:

or if you've been running it for a very very long time, it would be a decent idea to pull back to like a four five day or something like that, I don't think you should just run sixt days out of seven for three, sixty five days of the year.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yep,

[aaron_straker]:

Next question, thoughts on Jeff Nipper's style, full body training five days per week or five times per week.

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah, we had a full episode where we talked about uh, different splits. I think it was again like you know, episode eight through fifteen, range or something like that, like maybe almost a year ago at this point, but Um, I talked about kind of some of the drawbacks because I've done this and I've tried it with clients too, and we all kind of seem to have the same issue, which is that Um. Exercise selection becomes so so important that you almost are unable to do a lot of the exercises that you want to do because they're so fatiguing, So then you could just kind of say okay, dude, I get it, But then I'll just work less hard on those exercises, so okay cool. You work less hard on those exercises, but now you're essentially like four or five r. I, r, um. So when I implemented this this myself, I thought I was taking a prudent approach and I started at like three r. I r. for for most lifts and uh, I was just conflict. The first week or two. I was just constantly beat up and it wasn't even like. it wasn't even like good, beat up where I was just like mildly sore and excited to train. It was like you know, I do one or two sets. a leg press to three r. I r. And I'm sore for like three days, so that I'm supposed to come in and do like leg curls the next day and then leg extensions after that, and I'm supposed to squat the day after that. and even when you look at putting exercises in an order that is conducive to this, so I think we, we talked about this example. like where hamstring movements have to be very targeted and specific to to what the ex for for what the the frequency is, 'cause. Like, no matter what hamsstering movement you do unless it's a leg curl. like if it's a length anded overload hamstering movement, you're just going to be sore from it like an r, d l, or a g, h, r or a weighted hip extension or a stiff like a deadlift or a good morning. Like any of those big compound hamstring movements are going to put you on the floor even if you did two sets to four or five r, i r. Um, so it is doable, but you have to start literally at five r. i R. Like that has to be your starting point so you can build repeated Bo effect and and all that sort of stuff. Exercise selection becomes super duperpor. Um, like where would you put a dumbbell fly or something like? It's length and overload. You're goingnna be sore for two or three days from a Dumbell fly. So you know you have to start opting for like cable crossovers, and you know where do you put your presses and there's just a lot of considerations that you have to put in there. And then I would say the main mitigating factor because I think those two factors can be worked around through good programming. The main factor for me was that going into it. one of my main exciting aspects of it was that I was like I'm never going to have to have a full leg day Like it's great. You know well what ended up turning out was that every day felt like likeg day, because it was either like I'm doing leg curls and leg extensions or I'm doing leg press or I'm doing a stiff, likeg a deadlift or whatever it is like I'm always working legs and it always feels like mentally, you have to bring it, whereas it's really nice for me, Un, like a push pu leg split, or like an upper lower, where the upper days they just don't take as much out of you and you can kind of like save it. Up mentally again, coming to psychology, which I think is is ultimately. the biggest factor here as well. Um, but like you just have to be able to bring that intensity five days a week and that's hard. It's just it's just hard.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, I, the adaptation period of it is longer. It might take a full like two weeks to get used to it. Personally, I I agree with, I'm not a fan. I. I never say never, right've raned in the past. I, I may do some again, some reason in the future, but it's just not my favorite type of thing, mostly because of that psychological thing, like B said, It's hard when you have to mentally prepare for leg stuff like every single day, so Unc. Anything else?

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, I mean it's yeah. no. I agree. totally. um, yeah, the next one

[aaron_straker]:

thoughts on single set to failure. Training

[bryan_boorstein]:

I think it's great. I think it can work really well, especially for people that are uh, a little low on time, so every study has basically shown that one set gives you somewhere between like seventy and eighty plus percent of the benefit of doing three, four or five six sets. Um, so in that sense like okay, and let's actually backtrack a second if someone is doing a study and they think studies are all to failure Right, Because that's that's the protocol you go to failure in studies. Um, what's in reality? when you actually talk to people that do studies very rarely are people actually at failure? Um, what's happening is people are like? Oh, this is really hard. Now that seems like failure. I'm going to stop. and as a S. a scientist, you can't exactly just be like. No, you have to keep going. I mean I. I. I think there's like moral issues against that. Um, So and your number and goals to not get someone injured. So when they say they're at failure, you're You're like cool. You're at failure. If you? If you as a trainee, someone like me or you, you know we're going into it, We say we're going to do one set to failure. Well, one that a failure means there's three, four, five ramp upsets that occur leading to that. No, they're not work sets. They don't necessarily cause growth, but you're preparing to put the ultimate effort into one set. so that effort that you're putting into that set is probably higher than what the studies are doing for their six sets. And they're still saying that one set to failure probably even conducted shy. A failure in the studies. Is you know, giving you seventy or eighty percent of the benefits of six sets. Now you're taking your one set to like the house. I would guess that that one set is as stimulative as three or four sets that are done within a research lab. Um. so I think that that's one thing that you need to keep in mind is how much intensity can you bring to that set? If you're a novice to training and you're like I'm going to do one set to failure. You' like you'll probably get benefits for a little while, because you're a novice and everything works. But if you don't learn how to actually like, really get to failure. eventually, that's probably not going to work. So it's it's a skill to be able to take yourself to failure. Uh, and if you can do that, I think single such failure works great.

[aaron_straker]:

two things on. Add there, I think for this it's important to choose your wrap ranges and Wes appropriately for like, let's say you're on a hack squat right, and you' going do a single set of failure and you do like six raraps. The failure is more or less from like the wait. If you' going to be Hey, I'm going to do a set of failure, ands like nine to twelve raps. It's

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm.

[aaron_straker]:

going to be a nine and day type of scenario And you know the metabolic, like the metabolic, build up. your. how

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

awful you feel when performing it. Second thing is, I think this is going to make. Not, I mean not only from a safety, I mean primarily from a safety standpoint, but also from a being able to push standpoint. If you're training like this, training with a partner is going to be orders of magnitude more helpful. because they' going to say Okay. you have two reps. You know, you have two

[bryan_boorstein]:

hm,

[aaron_straker]:

reps left. Something like that based on your rep speed type of deal, and like gauging your rept speed yourself when you're in, Like the suck of it way too hard. I think just the the productivity you get out of this style of training with a partner would be infinitely more productive.

[bryan_boorstein]:

mhm. Yeah, and I think that if you're just going to do one set as well, you should take advantage of Uh, things like occasionally, not all the time, but maybe at the end of a messo, you know you're do. You're using your partner to get a couple four Stps in on the hack like Uh, partials, you know, across Le extensions and pull downs and things like that, so using more intensity techniques.

[aaron_straker]:

cool, Uh, best pullt progression bands. negatives. something else.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, so this person uh, didn't list my favorite one. The one that I always recommend which is rack pull upps, Um, The rack fullll up is the the one that's going to translate most effectively into a regular pull up. So the problem with bands is that the resistance curve is backwards, so at the bottom of a bandoned pull up you have a ton of help, but you don't really need all that help at the bottom. What you really need is that health at the top when the band isn't giving you any, Um, So the band is awful like I've never. I very rarely see people make significant gains in their pull up progress by using bands. Um, I love negatives, but I think negatives are best um. for like low rep strength work. I think if you're uh looking to improve your one wraper, two ret max pull up than negatives, and then subsequently weighted negatives are really really great. but for most people you know, if you're looking for increased pull up strength through the full range of motion with an even strength curve that's going to translate most directly to a pull up than doing uh, rack polllypses is for sure the best one.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, I. I really like rackpoles That's one of my favorite know, kind of like old school style, like hyperphy pulling type things you can do like a home gym or something like that, crossy really easily, So I, I would agree with you there,

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, yeah, you can actually kind of bias the Las a little bit too, which is something that you can't do very well in a crosst gym. Um, you can kind of angle your torso and put it into flection, so you can really kind of follow the the l. The Iliac lat, like the lower Lat, focused, kind of requirements of like a neutral grip and elbow driving into wateline and stuff like that, and like, even in a regular pull up you can't really do that. so uh, I think a rack pullp has unique benefit in that way as well.

[aaron_straker]:

agree. next question resources you would recommend for coaches wanting to expand their training knowledge.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, there's a really a bunch of really good ones so N one is obviously the one that first comes to mind because we talk about them a lot, But there's a company out in the U. K called the Muscle mentors and they run an education portal. Uh, much like N one does where they take you through a bunch of modules. they have like a a membership site with like tons of you know lectures and uh, scientific references and et cetera et cetera a video demos of movement stuff like that. So muscle mentors I've heard nothing but good stuff about them and I think they've actually collaborated with Cass on something here there. I've heard them talk about like uh, movement patterns and working together on stuff and and things like that. So they're very biomechanics focused as well, Um, I think that the three d m j vault is a great place. So three d m, j is a coaching company That does you know, mostly natural bodyuilding and power lifting and they have a a vault that I think is eight ninety nine a month that you can get access to and has all sorts of the same things like lectures and video demos of movements and blogs and stuff like that. Um, and then they also have a book called Uh, the Muscle and Strengths, Muscle and strength pyramids, which is a multip series. Um, that covers basically everything you need to know about training. Uh. Scott Stevenson has a book called B, Your own bodybuilding coach, which I just bought for a hundred dollars off Amazon Because I've absorbed so much knowledge from this man Scott Stevenson over the years and I honestly don't know. Like I haven't read the book yet. I just bought it because I wanted to support him and I wanted to kind of say thank you for like letting me absorb all your knowledge from all these podcasts for free for so many years. Um. so I'm pretty sure that that book's going to be awesome because Scott is is on a whole different level. Um, but those would be my my main recommendations.

[aaron_straker]:

Those are really really solid recommendations. One that now I been full transparent. I don't have any personal experience, but I've heard a lot of really good stuff around is the Hpertphy coach app. Um, I believe his name is Joe Bennett, but I'm please don't quote me on that in this very interesting new world where you know people by their instigram handles. If their insgra handle is not their name, You don't know what their actual name is. Um, so I've heard pretty cool things about that as well, but I mean, I think the resources Brian listed are going to be fantastic. and like we said, I'm I'm going to end one to learn. It's I couldn't

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yep,

[aaron_straker]:

be more excited. you know it. just I'm very very excited. So yeah, tons of really

[bryan_boorstein]:

Did you know that? Uh,

[aaron_straker]:

good people out there doing awesome stuff.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, did you know that Cass and Joe Bennett Heert F. Coach came up together in Florida.

[aaron_straker]:

I did not know that. actually,

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, so they? Uh, they were working under the same company. Am I forty with Uh, Ben Pekolski

[aaron_straker]:

I did hear some of the grumblings of the old school. The other.

[bryan_boorstein]:

and Cass no longer associates with either of those guys. They had a big falling out.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, it's uh, unfortunate that happens. I'm sure for

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

legitimate reason, Um, but

[bryan_boorstein]:

yep. anyway, I just thought that was an interesting. Uh. aside,

[aaron_straker]:

yeah,

[bryan_boorstein]:

cool. next question.

[aaron_straker]:

best way to gauge reps in reserve, if new to this type of training.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, uh, this questions from my de. Jason. He just started. Uh, started one of my evolve programs, so Um, the best obvious way is anchoring Um, which we we're not doing in my program. So I'll I expand beyond that in a second. but anchoring essentially means you test each movement to failure and then you know what failure is and then it becomes really easy to be okay. I got elevenps a failure. So eight is three r, i r, or whatever. Um, but what what we do in my programs? Because this is obviously a common question. is we start every messocycle which is like a four or five week period at two or three reps in reserve. So you just take your best guess at whatever two or three repses. You know. Maybe you're at five, Maybe you're at one. I, I don't know. Like it would be tough for me to see someone at one. Like to watch them do a back squat and have them you know, do a one r r' be like. Yep, that was five. Um, so I, I don't know. I, kind of. I kind of don't think that one's going to happen, but more likely you're going to air on the side of. like you know, I think I'm trying to do two to three, but I'm really doing five. Um, And so what happens in my programs to mitigate this as an issue entirely, Is we just add weight every week. So if you start at three r, i r, and then you add five pounds or ten pounds depending on the lift every single week for four or five weeks, eventually you're going to butt yourself up against failure. And that's what we do in the final week of the cycle before Deload. We take uh, all the repeating movements. We take a set to failure, and then that acts as you're anchoring for the next cycle. So we go through Deload week. we recover, we come back in the second cycle. We keep the same movements, the repeating movements that we did in the first cycle, but now you can kind of look at your performance from the weak prior to Deload, and be like Okay. I either sandbag the shit out of my prior weeks or I was pretty spot on, and then you can kind of assess from there what progression you need to make in the next messo cycle over the four or five week period to build yourself back up to essentially try and exceed what you did the prior messicycle,

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah that. I mean that first mess is going to be a a data gathering in learning.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yep,

[aaron_straker]:

then, especially with the not nervous system adaptation. We call them

[bryan_boorstein]:

nerl,

[aaron_straker]:

the neural adaptations. Yeah,

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

that' take place over that first mes. So anyway, you just got to pick some numbers and see, and then the second mes will be much more accurate and appropriate for youol. Do we recommend warming up and stretching before or just starting with

[bryan_boorstein]:

exactly. yep.

[aaron_straker]:

a light weight for the first movement, second part, second part, the question stretch before or after training?

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, you know, I've talked a lot about my feelings on warming up, and I think that what it ultimately comes down to is an Asz needed. basis. Uh, it depends on the type of training you're doing and it depends on how your body is feeling, how your body's made up. Um, as a personal example, right, like in cross fit, when we did a bunch of Olympic lifting, and the first thing we would do in the day was snatch, I would spend thirty or forty minutes with bands and stretching and foam rolling and sitting with an empty barbll over my head. and like all sorts of just assenine things that wasted so much of my time. Um, and then you know, contrast that with straight up highpertphy training, almost even like metabolite, Say we're going to do sets of you know twelve to twenty five. The amount of warming up that I would need to do for a set of twelve on almost any movement is is nothing like I would do an empty bar and then some light weight and and work up from there, Um, and then maybe somewhere in the middle is what I'm doing right now, which is power lifting, more or less. You know. I'm working up to really heavy weights in a low bar back squad and a dead lift and and more complex movements. Um. and so just to get my body into position for a low bar back squat like I have to start, essentially my first set with my hands out really wide, and then each set I'm able to move my hands in. Um, maybe you know an inch or two something like that and by the time I get to my actual top work set, my hands are nice and tight. the bars jammed into my back and I feel like really strong and secure. What I'm doing in between each of these warm upsets is. I'm acutely targeting the areas that are limiting me to get the bar into position, so I'm doing my low bar squad. I'm like, Oh, my right shoulder feels tight like on the anterior side. Okay, so I'm going to take a lacross ball and the leaning against the wall and I'm going to jam that into my interior dolt and I'm going to loosen that up. Okay that feels better. Now my posterar delt on my left side is acting up or whatever so like as I go through the progressions and add weight to the bar. I'm assessing what areas feel limited, and then I'm targeting those specific areas so it all kind of goes back to the Asz needed basis of warming up, which is what do you need to best prepare yourself to succeed in that session.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, this one is interesting and I agree a hundred percent of Brian back in the cross fit and Olympic lifting days like I needed a half hour to warm up, and the majority of the reason is wise, because my body feltll like a ho pile of fucking garbage every single day. Now I feel great pretty much all the time, and with the more hypertphy style it's just more forgiving for for this, so what I'll usually do is ill. I'll walk for maybe seven minutes or something like that. If it's a leg day, I might do three to four minutes on like a spin bike, just to like get some blood into my legs. I move through my end ranges of motion a couple of times, So if I'm doing like yesterday, I was doing some chests pressing first. I did some, uh, some arm circles, but not like you know, with momentum like slow and range of motion, moving my shoulders through their, like you know, full circle braringe em motion. Then I'll usually hop on like a a cable type machine. Um, where I can hit the selectized weight and I'll just do like sets of four and increase over time like I picked this up from John Meadows. A

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm, Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

really really great thing to get blood moving. And then I jump into my first exercise and you know, do maybe a couple low warm upsets and then I start moving. Um, it's really relative to how you're feeling. I'd say probably need a little bit more like the two areas. You really want to pay attention to your shoulders, and then maybe like your knees and low back type of stuff, depending on what you're doing, And I just move slowly through a couple reps until I I feel good and go from there. Uh, it's a night and day difference from you know, Seven eight years ago. I don't do much warming up at all because my movement patterns are much slower. I'm pausing. You know, in in different things it's It's really relative to the style of training you're doing and then for the second part I don't really stretch ever unless I go to a yoga class. Um, there are times where' like you know, Hi hit the uh lacrosse ball, and like my heels and feet, uh ankles type type of things a little bit, especially if you're doing a lot of hiking. I do have a little bit of tightness in, like my traps and rombos. I'll roll out on, but besides that, I might do that for two, three minutes a day like I go to one yoga class per week. That's it

[bryan_boorstein]:

cool. Yeah, I would say the one thing with stretching uh, static stretching is you don't want to do it before training, because it actually has been shown to uh, decrease contractile force when you static stretch, Uh, shortly after not permanently, but for like you know, for fifteen or thirty minutes after doing it. So you definitely don't want a static stretch before training. You could do dynamic stretching with like some movement and flows and stuff like that. Um, I occasionally do static stretch. Um, it's not something I do for training. It's mostly something I do to because it feels good. Uh, My favorite way to do it is in the shower. I like to literally just have the water pouring over my head and I will stretch for five minutes. You know, some sitting on the ground, some standing, some like twisting and hip stuff. and um, I, I love that it makes me feel amazing. And then I got out of the shower and I feel loose and good and yeah, that's that's my. That's my thoughts on that.

[aaron_straker]:

cool. Uh, best rep, A rarange for novices.

[bryan_boorstein]:

It's an interesting question. I mean the the. The answer is whatever repraine you can execute movement best in, so I think that uh, a set of six is probably too heavy like you're probably not going to have the coordination yet to be able to get the most out of a set of like six or eight. I also think a set of twenty to thirty is probably going to be so light that you're just go to, kinda be like moving around like a wet noodle, kind of. Um, so I would guess like if I had to put a refrange on it like ten to fifteen seems pretty good to me.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, I don't really have much for that, I would say,

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

Relative to your goals,

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yep,

[aaron_straker]:

would you ever use eccentric only training? Maybe at the end of a set,

[bryan_boorstein]:

personally, no, Um, I think this would be something relevant maybe for that person that asked about single set to failure training. Um, So maybe that's something that you add in at the end for anyone wondering. Ec. eccentric only is essentially like. So he's asking, maybe at the end of a set, but eccentric only training in its basis Is younna be just focusing on the lowering portion of a movement. So picture a bench press. and so you put a bunch of weight on the bar, maybe even more than you can lift, but you can lower down more weight than you can lift. So then you lower it down and then someone helps you lift it back up again, and then you lower it back down and someone helps you lift it up again. This type of training is extremely damaging, a ton of muscle soreness, a ton of muscle damage. Um, so much so that I think it would have to be built into progressively over time if you did want to do this, and I think that if you did it, you would have to take recovery into consideration as like a paramount concern, because you may not be able to train that muscle group again for more days than than you would if you hadn't done the eccentrics.

[aaron_straker]:

I will say I don't ever do it. The one thing I do sometimes is on my final Wp, when I know I'm done. I will like do like a very slow targeted E centr Coloor, and like the hack squad is the one that comes to mind like After I know Okay, I hit my six rips to my eight raps. I'm going to. I'm going to pull the stops in, you know, and lower really slowly. I will do that on some like, maybe six to eight, right rep type stuff. Am I doing that at the end of like a leg extension or something like that? Where im at like twelve reps. Absolutely not. but uh, it's the only time I'll ever do something like that.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, yeah, yeah, I think eccentric. only training would mean that there isn't a concentric, which then takes away like a huge piece of the hypertrophy

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, yeah,

[bryan_boorstein]:

puzzle. So um, I would not be doing that if that was my goal.

[aaron_straker]:

yeah, I don't think I would ever have like just straight negatives or anything like that. How would you gauge weights for back off set on primary li.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, yeah, so this is the way I tend to program these days a lot in many of my programs. Um, so we'll have like a top set of six to ten, and then a back off set of eight to twelve or ten to fifteen. Um, so I think in most cases you know a back off set should be fifteen to twenty percent less. Uh, depending on how the first set goes, Like if it was six to ten on the tops set and you got ten, then I might only drop it. You know ten to fifteen percent for the back offse, Uh, whereas if it was six to ten and I got six, then I might need to drop it twenty five percent for the back offs set. So I think it depends Um on those two scenarios and then kind of what your target refringses are.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, I don't. really. I think that's a perfect explanation there.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, our lifestyle questions. Let me ask a couple of these to you and we can go back and forth on them. Uh, we' almost done here. I'm getting adequate total sleep, but very little deep sleep thoughts. tips. effects.

[aaron_straker]:

This one is really hard for me to answer. I don't have much to really suggest here. if you're getting like eight, nine, seven and a half hours of sleep sleep. I wouldn't put too much into it. Um now, Granted, I'm sure there's a a sleep researcher or something like that who will completely crucify me on my words here. Uh, what I'm saying is it's not something that I currently understand sufficiently at a at a level to really give you Um tips here. But if you ever find anything cool, please let me know

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, for sure, I'm curious as well. I know that I've listened to a lot of the stuff that Greg Potter has done. He's out of the U. K. so I would look up. Uh, Greg Powder's work be cause he's a kind of sleep expert out there. and um, my other thought would be that if you're using an app to tell you that you're not getting a lot of deep sleep, but you are getting you know, seven eight hours. And you, it's just being told. it's not deep. I don't know like that's one of those things where I feel like this is why I've been so shy as to use it to sleep app. I've never used one before, because in my head like I'm in bed for eight hours a night, I sleep most of the time from nine to five Like that's pretty much my sleep. I wake up a couple of times, but I wake up feeling well rested and I don't want some app to tell me like you didn't get a lot of deep sleep. You feel like shit today and I'm like. No, I feel great, actually, but maybe I should feel like shit. I don't know. you know like. I don't want to start second guessing myself Because of an ap. I'd rather subjectively uh, assess how I'm feeling and kind of go from there.

[aaron_straker]:

that's a perfect thing to add. Now if you're sleeping eight hours and you wake up and you feel like absolute dog shit, and you sleep and you feel like you need another eight hours like that could be something indicative, But yeah, with using an app or something like that, it could there. there could be some. You know. user error could be some configuration thing, So if you're sleeping an adequate volume, you wake up feeling great. I wouldn't put too much into it.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yep. best tip for a good night's sleep. Best tips.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah, so my, uh come tips, there are going to be. You want to monitor your caffeine intake and how far into the day you are having caffeine intake? Um minimize your blue light exposure once the sun goes down, So if you are watching T V. still working on your phone, a set of blue blockers would be really really helpful there. Um, finding out what your personal threshold is for meal final, your final meal to proximity of sleep. So I have clients who cannot really eat within two hours of sleeper. It will really mess with their sleep myself. I'll eat twenty minutes before I go to bed. It'sly perfectly fine, so that one's going to be a little bit more individual. Um, this is a new one for me. I got to sleep a sleepe mask. I posted about it on Inram last week. It's been like a Holy Gil thing for me. I'm a very uh, light and sound sensitive sleeper, so I've like. I've done a lot of experimenting with ear plugs in the past, but I've never been like super superc consistent with it. But now every night ear plugs face mask, and there'll be sometimes like on the weekend if I don't set an alarm or whatever I'll like, I'll like finally wake up and I'll pull the face mask off and it'll be like broad daylight. I'm like ohing, fuck. it's like nine a M. So, and that's like complete opposite, because before it'd be especially in the summerime, when the sun will come up earlier, it'll start peeking through it like a little little after six and it'll wake me up so that sleep mask has been a game changer for me, So I would start with those more hygiene and habit based things before moving into any kind of supplements or anything like that. Anything from you, Brian

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah, No, I agree. you basically cover all the ones I was going to say as well,

[aaron_straker]:

cool?

[bryan_boorstein]:

Um, best recovery protocols, foam roll sauna, muscle snim. What else?

[aaron_straker]:

So what's really funny here is people always go to these things. Your best recovery protocols are adequate, sleep volume and quality in calories and food quality, and micran tance, like those are going to do quarters of magnitude more for you than like a muscle Stm or a foam roller or something like that. Will that being said, I do, I am a fan of the sauna. Um, I think it's something that's really cool especially because like, let's say, you have a house right and you have a garage and they are becoming more affordable, Type of thing there are. There is a lot of cool research coming out with saunas, especially if you like Doctor Rhonda, Patrick has some cool stuff on that, but you know I'm always going to start with sleep. adequate calories, micro nuutrient density and macernutrient distribution, Um, some simple walks before I really go down the rabbit hole of all these fucking boots and shit like that that people we and stuff before moving into these uh things that move the needle less than the big rocks,

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yeah,

[aaron_straker]:

Type of items

[bryan_boorstein]:

I? I agree. completely. Um, I personally love heat, so sauna, steam showers, hot tubs. these things are are so much better in the research now and I just enjoy them. but like in general, like when you look at the research, it's literally not even arguable. Now that cold dunks, blunt hypertrophy, Like, if you go and put yourself through an ice bath, you may as well not have even worked out because it's like you took a thousand iv B profan and just stunted the. Um, ah, what's the word?

[aaron_straker]:

inflamm.

[bryan_boorstein]:

I'm looking for the inflammation response. Yes,

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah,

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah, so uh, so heat is good? Uh, we have a seven spcket shower in my house and it also turns into a steam shower, which is insane. So I've been doing that. Uh, any time I feel like anything like a tickle in my sore throat, or or like, uh, noses clogged or anything, I go turn that jank up to like a hundred and ten and spend ten minutes in there and by the end you know all of that stuff has just dripped out of me and I feel amazing. So, um, so I'm a huge fan of stuff like that, and um, you know, I'll I'll phone roll and stretch, kind of like we mentioned before, but I don't really do it as a way, necessarily like pretraining to like stimulate training. It's just kind of something I do as I'm like watching T. V. and I'm like man, It'd be really cool to like crack my back right now and I'll go like uh, f, let out for like five minutes and kind of get a couple areas and move on with life. I don't know how much it actually helps from what I understand in the studies. Foam rolling is an acute um effect, meaning that it has been shown to help your positioning within minutes of doing it. Um. but there aren't any like long term benefits of like Say you foam roll yesterday that it's goingnna somehow have an impact tomorrow or a month from now or anything like that.

[aaron_straker]:

cool last, a question. I think we have here.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yep,

[aaron_straker]:

How do you stay motivated with a capital motivated all en caps to train solo?

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah, um, I, it's interesting because you kind of trained Sollo, too, so I think we can both add some perspective here, but this question is coming from. Uh, a guy that I've known for a really long time, he used to be a one on one client of mine during Uh, the cross fit days and he was a regional athlete And so I think he. I'm just going to go out on a limb here. I think he's struggling a little bit with training in a manner that still allows him to be the person he was seven eight years ago. Still be able to maintain the skills of snatching and muscle ups and these types of things. Um, and so that's a pro thing that you and I both went through is this kind of identity crisis of still being tied to these skills that we want to be good at. And so the only thing I can say really is that I'm training in a manner that I enjoy. Um, if I was trying to do crossfit training in my garage on my own, I think I would really struggle with that because I don't exactly enjoy it, so I truly look forward to my sessions and I, I don't even have to make this up like I'm not even just saying like I look forward to my sessions. Um, like I really do like I. I get excited about the opportunity to put headphones on to take a hit of weed to to improve myself and better myself. Almost like a person going out to play golf like you're not trying to play golf against other people. Necessarily, you might be. But you just go out there because it's peaceful and it's your time. And and you try to get better than you did the time before, and those types of things drive me. It speaks to my introverted side and I would recommend this person to to pick a type of training that they enjoy and maybe not try to train in a manner that they feel like they should be training in, but to train in the way that speaks to them.

[aaron_straker]:

That is such a fantastic answer. I, a couple of things that I will add. it does help. I am very introverted. Uh. I. I heard a quote very recently that I really liked it Said, If if you don't like, if you can't spend time by yourself, you're not in good company And don't get me wrong. That is a lot of confirmation bias for myself. but I love spending time by myself. Um, and training is just like a part of of how I can do that. I, I get to listen to to music. Um, I get to work on myself and and I and I really really like that And it's shifted over the years Now. It's a lot more from like the health and longevity standpoint, You know as I'm like Brian. What you're thirty nine? right?

[bryan_boorstein]:

Yep,

[aaron_straker]:

So like, I mean, I, I'm thirty three right now. I want to. I wantnna look like Brian when I'm thirty nine. Right. I have clients who are in there like fort, like forty seven, forty eight or an incredible shape. and I'm like Now it's like shifting like I. How long can I maintain this aspect of my youth? You know, Can I be a dad who's got kids in their teens and stuff like that and still be in really great shape and be of positive. You know role model in terms of how I take care of myself, how I prioritize my health sort of thing. So it's more than just like the. Oh, I want to look good. you know that is'. that is a a secondary aspect that comes along. You know more easily now, but I, I really, just I've always loved lifting weights and it's shifted in different times. You know I couldn't do cross fiit right now, and I think what it really came down to is like, I just I. I didn't want to, you know, and and I think everyone goes through their different methodologies or their different, you know characterchs of of training, but I don't know Crosss. It was really fantastic for for me in that point in my life. I think it more than anything it played into being able to compete A as being like a high school athlete. That and then was now no longer an athlete type of thing, and then that ran its course and then now it's just like I just love lifting weights. I've since like the first couple times I did it. I loved lifting weights. I think

[bryan_boorstein]:

Mhm,

[aaron_straker]:

I always will and it just fills a lot of gaps and holes in in in my life. Um, I don't need that like a bad way. It's just a a whoy positive net benefit in my life, and I think at this point like I, I would enjoy training with someone like every once in a whilee, but I think if I had the choice to, I trained by myself for a, or like a daily partner, I'm going to choose training by myself. To be completely honest.

[bryan_boorstein]:

it would take the right person like I feel like if you were local and we could be on like the same routine and train at the same time together. and we could also kind of have our introverted space while we're training, but just have like the other person there as like an accountability piece. I feel like that would work really well, but for sure I could see a number of different types of personalities that would not viide with me and I would just be like Y. let me give myself here. you know,

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah,

[bryan_boorstein]:

So No, totally. That was a great answer. And uh, and I agree, like it really is just like it's It's so positive in my life and I think about this all the time. like sometimes I'll say things like people ask me a question, and it's not even related to training. But I use the way that I think about training as like an analogy in my head when I create my response to them, and then I'm like Oh, Well, because of training, I was able to come up with this really cool answer that was completely unrelated to training. and I just think it's provided me so many life benefits like that along the way as well.

[aaron_straker]:

yeah, it's it's. I love it and I mean the end of the day just for the health standpoint, bone bone mineral density, which is going to be so vital as as we age. You know, metabolic efficiency. Like all these different things, it's like like every single person should in some capacity, be doing some form of resistance training. And if you just look at it from that standpoint Um, the B. the positives are just astounding

[bryan_boorstein]:

yep, yep, totally,

[aaron_straker]:

cool. Anything to add on this one, Brian,

[bryan_boorstein]:

no man, I love. I love rapid fire questions. We weren't actuallyly as rapid as I thought we would be,

[aaron_straker]:

Of course, not.

[bryan_boorstein]:

but I think we did. I think we did a good job and I think next time we get a a bombardment of uh, a barrage of questions. we should. Uh, we should do a similar type format because it's kind of cool. Instead of picking and choosing like the best six to just be like pocket, we're going to answer all of them.

[aaron_straker]:

Yeah. Yeah, I agree. I really did my damned dis. I'll have to go back through and listen to the episode. Well, obviously I obviously do when I edit it. I believe I never said the word, especially on this episode and I' tried.

[bryan_boorstein]:

Especially,

[aaron_straker]:

Especially. I tried really fucking hard too, So we'll see what happens. So

[bryan_boorstein]:

I love that,

[aaron_straker]:

uh with that guys, Thank you for listening is always Brian

[bryan_boorstein]:

yep.

[aaron_straker]:

and I will talk to you next week.

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How long should cuts and bulks be? Until you hit goals, or what is the recommendation? 
Nutrition and lifestyle tips for a college student who doesn’t wanna “miss out?” 
Studies or new findings that have changed the way you train and program?
On days with a lengthened overload squat, would you prefer lengthened or short overload leg extension as secondary movement.
If young training age, will “ME” (muscular endurance) training translate to overall/max strength. If so, how long?
Do you find for yourself and clients, that training 6 out of 7 days is too much?
Thoughts on Jeff Nippard style full body training 5x/week?
Thoughts on single set to failure training?
Best Pull-up progression? Bands, negatives?
Resources we recommend for coaches wanting to expand training knowledge? 
Best way to gauge RIR if new to this type of training?
Do we recommend warming up and stretching before, or just starting with light weight for first movement? (second part; stretch before or after training?)
Best rep range for novice?
Would you ever use eccentric-only training? Maybe at the end of a set?
How do you gauge weights for backoff set on primary lift? 
I’m getting adequate total sleep, but very little DEEP sleep. Thoughts/tips/effects?
Best tips for a good night sleep? 
Best recovery protocols? Foam roll, sauna, muscle stim? Others?
How do you stay MOTIVATED to train solo?