Eat Train Prosper

Training Career Hindsight Wisdom | ETP#86

September 20, 2022 Aaron Straker | Bryan Boorstein
Eat Train Prosper
Training Career Hindsight Wisdom | ETP#86
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

If you could do the training career all over again, with your current knowledge, how would you do it?

A deep, thought-provoking question that had been sent in that we wanted to give a full episode to cover in depth. We are definitely in the midst of a very interesting time in the world of lifting weights and the minds and science being given to training. Looking back on 20+ years spent training, how would we change things, if at all?


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[aaron_straker]:

oh what's up guys happy tuesday welcome back to another episode of train prosper today brian and myself are going to dig a little bit deeper on a question that we answered very very briefly two episodes ago and part one of the august instagramq and in that question is slash was if you could go back and do your training career all over again with the current knowledge how would you do it i just thought that it was a very very kind of thought provoking question and in the in kind of in respect of the other questions we weren't really able to take as deep on this one as i thought we could have so we're going to make a full episode out of it which is today before we get into this though we have some dates as always brian can you kick us off

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah so regarding the topic for today just to clarify you and i had kind of discussed how if the question is about like your career and we kind of answer this on the actual q an episode if it's about your career and what you would change like professionally we both kind of agreed that we didn't want to change anything because it wouldn't have gotten us to where we are right now so i think the perspective that we're going to take this question is more like specifically related to the way in which we trained and m and things of those nature as far as like how would you change the way you trained as a beginner intermediate advanced and through that process to get to where you are with your training knowledge right now as a pose it being like well i wouldn't have done my nine years of cross fit i would have just stayed in body building the whole time because who knows how that would have actually ended up putting me in the space so so an one portant distinction slash clarification but but i think it'll be a fun episode to discuss okay cool so jumping into up dates real quick i'm in a bin in a sweat shirt it's that time of year again here it's now down into the high forties at night and we're still getting high seventies low eighties during the day but it's starting to get that big disparity between temperatures and so when i wake up at five a m to do our podcast it's in the forties and your boy is cold so be this will be a bit more of a general process going forward here but anyway it jumping into actual updates that matter so i mentioned on the last episode that paragon has a new app that is super cool the launch has gone swimmingly and everyone is really really aped on the new app the new program for bees program that's my program um that started i guess officially it started on september twelfth with the new cycle but i kind of took up prior week before that to run through the six sessions at i would call it even like a lower effort than a deloadweek like most of my stuff was three to six are and just kind of i call it a flow week which is an interesting name because it's exactly what it is like it's not a de load week or an intro week it's just a flow week like i'm just kind of trying to feel it out feel the flow of the workout figure out movements need to change i also filmed a number of videos for movements that i didn't have because there's some new exercises kind of making their way into the program this cycle so it was a really really cool for me i really enjoyed that and it's something i may incorporate into the future because i'm never great at actually flushing fatigue fully i feel like a lot of times i end up carrying fatigue from one cycle into the next but doing this flow week is really cool because it really kind of does force me to take a step back and just kind of go into the sessions with like a different perspective maybe so for me personally i really enjoy that and one of the new movements that i'm doing in my program in this i mentioned the last episode but it's it's a push legs pull push legs pull type split over nine to ten under days so you're training four or four and a half days a week depending on the week but one of the new movements i'm doing is a push up of try set push up i've been having just a hell of a time the last two weeks through the flow week and then into this first week trying to figure out how to load it successfully because i cannot do dips my gym like i literally cannot there's i've racked my brain for the last six months on how i could set up dips and short of buying boxes or something where i could put my paralets on top of the box and you're you know you're taking up a ton of space and you have all these boxes that you have to deal with um and move around and balablah and so that whole thing just i didn't want to have to go buy boxes to do dips a number of people sent me cool things like there's these dip attachments you can put into a power rack that actually just come to the middle of the rack and then you can dip in the love it like that but my power rack is a stand alone unit not an actual power rack so it doesn't have the holes every three inches it's like concreted on or cemented on with what do you got bro m

[aaron_straker]:

i have an idea

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

in your gym is there not a like a steel beam in the middle of it because it's in the basement

[bryan_boorstein]:

yes

[aaron_straker]:

i'm fairly certain that you could rig up like a a you kind of attachment or circle attachment that would have bolts on it on either end

[bryan_boorstein]:

hm

[aaron_straker]:

and then on the other side of that you could the dip thing with it would have a pin that would lever them like up you could store them up and then bring them down

[bryan_boorstein]:

m

[aaron_straker]:

it might require like like a local handy man

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

with it but i would say that would be very doable off

[bryan_boorstein]:

that's

[aaron_straker]:

of that

[bryan_boorstein]:

pretty involved but yes definitely an option

[aaron_straker]:

definitely involved

[bryan_boorstein]:

uh

[aaron_straker]:

for sure

[bryan_boorstein]:

uh but for like you know

[aaron_straker]:

a

[bryan_boorstein]:

just trying to load a push up slash dip style movement right now i actually did have a couple decent suggestions so apparently

[aaron_straker]:

oh

[bryan_boorstein]:

there's this like heavy duty belt thing that has an actual pin on it i can't remember

[aaron_straker]:

m

[bryan_boorstein]:

what company made it but it's kind of like a yeah i would just say it's kind

[aaron_straker]:

just

[bryan_boorstein]:

of like a

[aaron_straker]:

me oh

[bryan_boorstein]:

a vest

[aaron_straker]:

is

[bryan_boorstein]:

but instead of the vest having weights in it it has a loading pin on it and so you can actually like load weights on to a vest that then stabilizes on your body type thing i'm not a hundred percent sure if i could load that myself or if i would need a partner for that um but it's basically like you're wearing this thing and then the pin sticks up i assume out of your back so that you just like load the it's on to it but the other option that people suggested is to take a dip belt double loop it so it's super tight up against my body and then use small plates like fives and tens to load it so maybe with my vest plus a dip belt with an additional twenty or thirty pounds on it that might get me close to the range that i want because right now a thirty pound vest but i was doing sets of ten to twelve to like four r i r and if you all know me you know that i hate higher reps so the idea of having to do like sets of fifteen plus is not enticing to me so i'll probably try that but that's the one hick up that i found is trying to figure out how to how to progress and load a dip or push up style movement there's even been part of me that was like you know what screw this i'm just going to do like a close grip bench press type thing and we'll call it even but i did want to experiment with with this option first before i give in to that so that was that's the one thing there and then i have a few more updates but the one i want to touch on before jumping back over to you is i just did a really long facebook live for paragon on the new cycles and for the first time i'm going to consistently introduce the idea of progressing movements differently throughout a mess o cycle based on their length or short overload relationship so i spent like the first twelve minutes of my facebook live basically being like hey there is a difference between a split squat or an art and a bicep curl or a lateral rays and here's why it matters um and here's how it affects the progression through the messocycle so i'm not going to take things into like a super extremely con mplicated manner like we're doing on my program where there's reverse drop sets and length and only sets and like really kind of pushing the boundaries there past maybe what science would validate as reasonable right now but i think at least treating lateral raises and other short overload movements differently than lengthened movements is at least an important step in the right direction for a program that is trying to target as many people as possible right like not trying to over complicate or overstep where science currently is but making sure that we're still on the forefront of science and kind of in the boundaries there a little bit so it's a delicate balance for sure but something that i think our audience is ready for and something that i'm excited to implement

[aaron_straker]:

yeah that's really really cool because it the difference is quite stark in contrast and i think obviously like you had a post a couple weeks ago that illustrated it i think so perbly given the

[bryan_boorstein]:

ah

[aaron_straker]:

you know hatever elveelvetwenty character limitations or whatever

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

there are there going to be those middle movements where it's hard to decipher but like like you said the difference

[bryan_boorstein]:

oh

[aaron_straker]:

between an r d l

[bryan_boorstein]:

m

[aaron_straker]:

in terms of proximity to failure you probably

[bryan_boorstein]:

m

[aaron_straker]:

should train it in and something like a bise carl i mean it's night and

[bryan_boorstein]:

m

[aaron_straker]:

day um and

[bryan_boorstein]:

oh

[aaron_straker]:

being able to understand that from a training program consumer or maybe customers the proper terminology here

[bryan_boorstein]:

oh

[aaron_straker]:

it's really really helpful making those informed decisions in the gym like you know in the trenches on when you are training on making sure that you are doing your best to consistently progress throughout a training cycle

[bryan_boorstein]:

for sure dude for sure what is going on in your world right now

[aaron_straker]:

so actually really really great transition here i decided today i'm in this thing where i'm like at the basically the end of my program because i'm leaving bolly in nine days and it's not going to have a lot of the access to these things on this super remote

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

gym we go to when we're back in virginia and now what i pared my my hack squad again like what i was

[bryan_boorstein]:

ice

[aaron_straker]:

briefly talking about next week so last week so next week i will have one week shot at four plates per side which was what i massed out at the end of my strength cycholodi was able to get five raps like with damn dying on that fifth rep and now next week i will be my goal is nine for that which is pretty bad ass we'll see if nine happens it could realistically be like fucking six and then i really spent

[bryan_boorstein]:

ah

[aaron_straker]:

months for no fucking reason

[bryan_boorstein]:

i think if you get six at this point then that's more a factor

[aaron_straker]:

oh

[bryan_boorstein]:

of you just carrying too much fatigue from the build over the last two months or month or whatever it is m because you already hit like one seventy five for nine or

[aaron_straker]:

i did

[bryan_boorstein]:

ten

[aaron_straker]:

i

[bryan_boorstein]:

or

[aaron_straker]:

did

[bryan_boorstein]:

whatever

[aaron_straker]:

one seventy

[bryan_boorstein]:

that

[aaron_straker]:

five

[bryan_boorstein]:

was

[aaron_straker]:

for ten today

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah so if you were to go one eighty for six at this point i would say that that's less a factor of like oh i just spun my wheels for two months and more a factor of yeah i just kind of hit my limit with that one seventy five for ten and i just fatigue myself and don't have anything left but i think at this point like you've been progressing consistently

[aaron_straker]:

ye

[bryan_boorstein]:

it wouldn't surprise me if you get those eight or nine ten reps that you want with one eight

[aaron_straker]:

i was it was a bit of a joke i think i will and i think what you know fingers crossed what i'll try and do is have jenny come to the gym or be at the gym at that time try and record it and have her actually like spot me and actually push it to lie up true one r i r because like we say with with those compounds especially leg type stuff like a three r r it might actually feel like a one i ardy where you might think like oh funk the weight stopping you know but then you watch the video and you're like it just kind of slow

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

down a little bit so i might actually try and really really push that with like a spot or next week because i know we're

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

going to be travelling and will be in the gym for probably like for four days or something like that and i'll be you know a de load in that regard

[bryan_boorstein]:

yep

[aaron_straker]:

but to get where i was going i had that progression today and then

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

i said you know what i am not doing these damn dum bell ariels

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

the thing that's really funny and the note that i have here is like i'm just going to swap them for for bar bell are ls the dumbbell red just feel so much more like heavier and daunting because theyre basically just detached from each other and there's that individual variability of you having to stabilize the two of them but like the last the last set i did last week was with my top set was the fifty seven point five cages which is like i don't know like one went or one one fifteen or something like that the dumb bells only go up to to sixties but i was just like it buried me so much it took so much out of me i was like i'm over this i'm just going to go back to already barbell ardis and it was so much simpler so much simpler even though i had on like extra forty or fifty pounds

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

but just by using the bar ballet feels like completely different which is very very it's very it's just interesting honestly so that was like my random thought

[bryan_boorstein]:

m

[aaron_straker]:

from today's training session

[bryan_boorstein]:

i like the tactile sense of having the bar belt kind of scraping up along your body as you're going through the ariel um and so i actually as much as i really want to like the trap bar

[aaron_straker]:

oh

[bryan_boorstein]:

because i like romanticize it in my head and i'm like yeah neutral group is just better on everything but every time that i go and try the trap bar r d l it just feels less stable for me because i have that tactile sensation of the bar being right there on my body so i

[aaron_straker]:

oh

[bryan_boorstein]:

really do like dumb bell

[aaron_straker]:

yeah

[bryan_boorstein]:

ardis and i notice a lot of the same of what you're talking about but the thing i really like about the dumb ard is that it allows me to keep a semipronated grip and

[aaron_straker]:

exactly

[bryan_boorstein]:

for whatever reason that feels even better for me than neutral or pronated is just in that lesemipronated position so anyway for

[aaron_straker]:

man

[bryan_boorstein]:

what that's worth like i love that aspect of it and maybe somebody will design a trap bar that has forty five degree handles on there because that would be pretty sweet to i totally buy that

[aaron_straker]:

i might be making this up but i feel like the prime one the handles rotate

[bryan_boorstein]:

they

[aaron_straker]:

have

[bryan_boorstein]:

do

[aaron_straker]:

you

[bryan_boorstein]:

but they're still they're still so wide

[aaron_straker]:

yeah

[bryan_boorstein]:

that they're outside of your body so i kind

[aaron_straker]:

and

[bryan_boorstein]:

of want them to be like a little

[aaron_straker]:

yeah

[bryan_boorstein]:

bit tighter into the body you know what i mean

[aaron_straker]:

yeah and and that's exactly the one thing that you were when i was going to bring up but you actually you know ended up covering it but the trap are it's just it's too wide like the hand

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

positioning it's just too wide to feel really really comfortable on one i am using the dumas i like them to be like literal right outside like my interior tip like kind

[bryan_boorstein]:

yep

[aaron_straker]:

of thing and that feels very very comfortable and like no neutral normal to me

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah but for whatever

[aaron_straker]:

god

[bryan_boorstein]:

reason like i hate pronated everything except the barbellardl is just better than the other options right now

[aaron_straker]:

yeah yeah

[bryan_boorstein]:

interesting

[aaron_straker]:

yeah

[bryan_boorstein]:

you got anything else

[aaron_straker]:

i do have one it's a little bit like a meta kind of up date for for a brief discussion type thing and something that i have this has been hard for me through my professional life especially entrepreneur ship and i just as curious getting your thoughts around it so

[bryan_boorstein]:

hm

[aaron_straker]:

for me that that's that's challenging me is like your tangible versus less tangible or intangible type work so part of the reason i love have always loved the gym and training so much as it's like i do enjoy hard work when there's like an even exchange right you have like the heavy bar bell dumb bell weight in your hands the the exertion of physical exertion you get perspiration sweat very like

[bryan_boorstein]:

oh

[aaron_straker]:

tangible that exchanging kind of value and i've always loved that personally i've struggled more with like the parts of entreprenership is so much of it is intangible like self development right is really just like being aware of your thoughts and these things that are like to me less tangible and it's been a lot more difficult but what i kind of want of the share is like i'm finally finding my groove with like knowing i'm building something that i'm really not going to capitalize on for like let's say eight months or nine months or something like that but my desire to do the work is just as high as my desire

[bryan_boorstein]:

m

[aaron_straker]:

to do like the physical work um and it's just been like a very very interesting progression um

[bryan_boorstein]:

oh

[aaron_straker]:

because it's very kind of different like the exchange isn't very like i do five reps i get like the push back of the gravity or the load like giving me that it's like you're putting something up front that there is no resistance to there's no immediate need for it and then like just understanding that at some point in the future i will then get that like reciprocity of it

[bryan_boorstein]:

h m

[aaron_straker]:

want to get your thoughts around that a little bit and i thought it would be kind of like an interesting aside into the conversation around looking back on things because this is going to be a bit of an introspective style episode

[bryan_boorstein]:

m yeah i think it's an interesting an interesting thing to think about for sure and my first thought when you were talking about that is that the ability to embrace those more

[aaron_straker]:

oh

[bryan_boorstein]:

intangible things almost comes as like a secondary step in your development as a professional like and what i mean by that is when you're first starting out everything that you do has to apply to something practically it's going to turn into revenue or the ability to produce revenue because you just don't have that leeway yet but as you become successful and you make your footprint known within the industry that you're working in now you have a bit more freedom to kind of be working on the fringe of what may or may not be tangible um and you can look at the long game and say well i can continue to do what i'm doing right now and i don't need to immediate returns on this thing that i'm doing because i can just hang out and continue being okay and then in the long run either i'm better for this or maybe it betters my business because this work that i'm putting in now and so it sounds like you've gotten to a space in your development where you feel comfortable where you are and you're not scared to take some time on something that may or may not actually produce something tangible

[aaron_straker]:

that's a really good way to put it but one thing i wanted to say is i will be very transparent i am always scared of pretty much

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

everything the future

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

as much as i'm super

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

excited about it it absolutely tear finds me um but yeah you kind of hit the nail on the head and something that i think it's kind of just like that progression like you said as you go through professionally or through an entrepreneur pursuit um i don't talk about it on the podcast too much but i do have like a small group mentor ship of coaches that i run um and one of the like sometimes a question pops up is like outside of client chickens like okay i have my chickens on these days like then how do i plan like the rest of my week because the thing that's nice especially from an entrepreneral pursuit with the client chickens like you have like this handshake you know coaching agreement with clients on these days i produce for you x you know sort of thing but then aside from that and same thing with you

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

brian likewise you're building different programs and stuff like that i'm sure it's not just like okay like six weeks is up and now i got to write like you know my twelve new programs tomorrow start to thigbecause you can't do it in that kind of capacity you're like have to plan ahead sort of thing and it's just interesting now as i'm like planning these longer term things that i won't get any kind of push back or feedback on for months and months but just having like that fire lit and

[bryan_boorstein]:

hm

[aaron_straker]:

i've really enjoyed it because it's i've always loved physical work but like the mental work has been always been problematic and i feel like i'm finally

[bryan_boorstein]:

m

[aaron_straker]:

kind of like coming over that like you know first peak of that and starting to enjoy that not as much as the physical work not by any stretch of the

[bryan_boorstein]:

hm

[aaron_straker]:

imagination but it's not kicking my ass anymore like it used to

[bryan_boorstein]:

ah no that's interesting very cool to see that development

[aaron_straker]:

yeah

[bryan_boorstein]:

and it actually

[aaron_straker]:

that's

[bryan_boorstein]:

it got me thinking as well just as you were talking

[aaron_straker]:

oh

[bryan_boorstein]:

about this idea of how as i prepare these cycles for my programs and every six or twelve weeks there's kind of something new like imagine if i didn't have the passion for all of this and the desire to dig into the research and trial out all these new things and learn about length and movements and why partials are important and things like that i imagine if i just was like hey what i did in two thousand eighteen was cool people like that so every cycle is just going to be just like that you know imagine i never innovated or had the passion to experiment myself and just put out this cookie cutter thing each week and people would be like they'd get it there would be no questions because everyone would know exactly what to do but nobody would be excited to learn or or feel the kind of invigorated nature and passion that i feel too so i think that that there's definitely something about putting in what you don't actually receive as tangible like putting in the intangible work of following in my case my passion for learning and curiosity to to experiment and then being able to pass that down to people versus just being like hey five by five it works for ript let's just keep rolling with it you know so so yeah i think that that's it's related but but relevant and and kind of just i guess if i ever lose that passion to continue experimenting and be curious about training then i think that the people that follow my programs are going to feel that and they're going to be like hey you know i don't feel the passion either so it kind of works reciprocally both ways

[aaron_straker]:

agreed agreed i really like that

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

that note that you you added on their

[bryan_boorstein]:

the last thing i have before we jump into the top because i have two more quick updates but i'm getting pr p in my knee today so i actually i was going to google this but i guess i ask you since you've had p r p before but do you see any reason why i can't train legs today and then go in and get p r p in my leg right afterward

[aaron_straker]:

before you go

[bryan_boorstein]:

so i would train like literally this morning when we get off the podcast and then go get p r

[aaron_straker]:

yeah

[bryan_boorstein]:

p three hours later

[aaron_straker]:

i can't think of anything

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

for

[bryan_boorstein]:

i'm

[aaron_straker]:

any

[bryan_boorstein]:

gonna

[aaron_straker]:

reason

[bryan_boorstein]:

google it

[aaron_straker]:

why

[bryan_boorstein]:

just to be sure because they never told me not to do that or anything but basically today is going to be my final leg session where i'm able to train both flags and then i guess i get p r p later so i will not have another leg day for three days which will be good and then once i go back to training legs for the next one to two weeks i believe i need to do le single leg work on my right leg and not touch my left leg at all i'm going to ask about ham string work and see if i can do hamstring stuff because the p p is going into my quad so maybe i can still do like a hip extension i'm not sure about a leg curl because it involves knee flexion similarly like to what a squat would even though it work in different muscles so i don't think i can girl but i might be able to hip extension i'm not really sure but either way i'm probably going to be doing mostly single leg stuff for two weeks and then he said i could gently introduce next and so no deflection i can't do squats or pendulum or anything like that but i could potentially do

[aaron_straker]:

a

[bryan_boorstein]:

leg extensions um and then by three or four weeks i should be able to start incorporating squats and and full leg training again so that's just a small hick up in the plan but just kind of the way things go and how you have to kind of modify and work around stuff

[aaron_straker]:

i'm

[bryan_boorstein]:

as ah

[aaron_straker]:

really

[bryan_boorstein]:

as

[aaron_straker]:

really

[bryan_boorstein]:

life happens

[aaron_straker]:

excited yeah sorry i was just want to say i'm really excited to see in

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

like you know next week when we talk two weeks after that how how that quade and stuff is feeling

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

after that

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah it's actually like very inhibiting right now and it makes me wonder if it is just the quad or if it's also the miniscus that i had mentioned was torn from two thousand sixteen or something like that because i'm actually like there's certain things i do now that are just weird

[aaron_straker]:

m

[bryan_boorstein]:

like you know when you do that quad stretch where you reach behind you to pull your your leg up and kind of have it touch your butt i actually can't get my heel to my butt on that leg um

[aaron_straker]:

because those quads are

[bryan_boorstein]:

m

[aaron_straker]:

so big dude

[bryan_boorstein]:

but

[aaron_straker]:

oh

[bryan_boorstein]:

the right leg's fine um so anyway i'm curious to see if that if this this p p

[aaron_straker]:

yes

[bryan_boorstein]:

injection fixes that because if it doesn't then it is in fact the miniscus that's rearing its ugly head from like six five six years ago and not the quad in which case it would really suck if i go to p r p and then still have to get maniscas surgery so i'm ill i have a bit of trepidation about that but but we'll see and i'll keep you guys updated and then the last thing is the nasal breathing

[aaron_straker]:

i

[bryan_boorstein]:

stuff is still going great still progressing i know you and i have talked off line about this and you had mentioned that you got up into like the high one forties or something like that are you performed better at a lower you perform better you performed at the same

[aaron_straker]:

heart

[bryan_boorstein]:

b

[aaron_straker]:

rate

[bryan_boorstein]:

p m but you had a higher effort level on your machine which is cool

[aaron_straker]:

yeah yeah

[bryan_boorstein]:

and i i finally hit average heart rate of one fifty two for my nasal only ride two days ago twenty seven minutes six

[aaron_straker]:

oh

[bryan_boorstein]:

and a miles and i kept a hundred and fifty two average heart rate with a peak of one sixty seven so those are both p rs for me and i literally felt like i was drowning most of the time like was me passing people on the trail like you know just trying to stay in my nose but like just not working as efficiently as i would i hit to um but not drowning just feeling like i was going to drown so i think it's those super uncomfortable experiences that actually or what create the success and push that vio to max and that ability to take in oxygen even higher so i'm okay feeling uncomfortable but i'm becoming less and less excited each tim i have to do one of these nasal rides because i know that the bar has been set higher and higher and higher so yeah it's becoming more of a stress each time i do it as opposed to a likparasympathetic experience so i'm probably going to stop trying to push the boundaries on that a bit i mean a hundred and fifty two beats per minute is eighty five percent of my maximum heart rate and i was basically able to keep that breathing through my nose so i don't really know that there is a lot to go beyond that but i feel like i've really created some cool success with this and i feel rewarded and that's pretty cool

[aaron_straker]:

definitely i understand your the situation you just

[bryan_boorstein]:

u

[aaron_straker]:

described where you're like sucking

[bryan_boorstein]:

h

[aaron_straker]:

in through your nose like super

[bryan_boorstein]:

uh

[aaron_straker]:

hard like that was me and then the oth day and when i got off

[bryan_boorstein]:

h

[aaron_straker]:

i was like my nostrils are on

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

fire like this feels awful it's like you know like that fran lung feeling from

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

like pushing

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

yourself to our like my nose that was in my nose and i was like i hate this ye

[bryan_boorstein]:

it's pretty bad

[aaron_straker]:

but at

[bryan_boorstein]:

i just couldn't wait to breath through my mouth i like ripped the tape off

[aaron_straker]:

okay

[bryan_boorstein]:

and was like

[aaron_straker]:

yeah

[bryan_boorstein]:

okay

[aaron_straker]:

m

[bryan_boorstein]:

so anyways we can totally jump into the topic for today if you want to get us go an lo in here

[aaron_straker]:

yeah i'll i'll start off so kind of just to recap if we could do like our training careers all over again with the current knowledge we have now like how would we go about it in the first thing that really came to my mind and we have very briefly touched on this the podcast before the really interesting thing with lifting weights and training is

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

you generally et into it when you're young because like yeither like you want to impress girls or you want to be strong or whatever and you just learn like oh this movement does this like this movement does this but you never actually really learn about bio mechanics or how the body works or anatomy or anything like this and then there's a lot of stuff that's like super bro science where some of it i mean like your best even like your super brow like you know pro body builder they know their ship pretty well like they might not be able to articulate it as eloquently as a chris beardsley or a cast or something like that and results are largely the same than they understand but your average like gym person really has no idea and like that was me and it's just like there are so many times that i was confused about something you didn't really know or some days i would have a great training session i wouldn't i'm like man why is this one so awesome and then i couldn't replicate it in terms of like a bill you to achieve a pump or how my joints felt or performance or different things like that and it's because i just didn't understand like hey when i used this machine to set up that try sep extension i would actually at this much better angle my elbow was in line with the a line of pull with the cable and then when you do it the next week i'm like the other machine it's not like that at all and you're like why it doesn't this feel like the other one did but i was just never i just never thought enough to actually go through and try and find more information to help connect that as opposed to like don't know it was just good one day and the next day it wasn't and i was just like on to the next thing so i would say like the first and most glaring thing is like i wouldn't have i really wish i would have learned a little bit more of the text side and text book side and mental aspect

[bryan_boorstein]:

m

[aaron_straker]:

of understanding mechanics in anatomy earlier because now so so glaringly obvious

[bryan_boorstein]:

m yeah that's an interesting point because i feel like that information wasn't available then so like we were kind of in a position where even if it was available it would it would have to be through textbook and i don't know too many high school kids that their inclination is going to be that and i know we're putting it into the icuphoric world where everything is optimal and so maybe where we can even pretend that we're fifteen again in two thousand twenty two and so now we have access to all this stuff right so that would be like one perspective to take it the other perspective to just play a little devil's add here and i'll go back on a story of kind of how i got started real quick which we've talked about in other episodes but in the late nineties i dropped into an easy board which was kind of the discussion for him of the nineties

[aaron_straker]:

yeah

[bryan_boorstein]:

and paul carter lift run bang was kind of one of the big voices in this form at the time so i'm like you know fifteen sixteen years old and paul carter maybe six seven eight years older than me been training for a while big dude lots of muscle um and the advice he gave me at the time was basically full body three times a week hit your big compounds with like a five by five type thing and come back and see me when you're at three hundred four hundred five hundred type type thing talking about bench squad dead lift and then i have had conversations with paul since then on d m and he's kind of i've mentioned to him how thankful i am that that was the advice that he gave me in the early days and he was just like oh that was awful advice i would never give that advice now and and so i kind of struggle with that as a response because like yes to your point with what we know now there may be a better way like you could probably learn and use more specific movements and stuff like that but then we also have to remember that at fifteen years old yeah what i did what he prescribed me taught me hard work it taught me what it feels like to get under a bar bell and barely be able to stand back up when you sit down it taught me what it's like to have to brace and prepare myself to pick up a heavy weight off the ground and i don't know that that same sense of hard work and dedication to the process and all of that would be the same if i was being prescribed hack squat and a iliac pull down and dual cable lateral rays or or something along those lines i just think there is something about grit and determination that is taught through big com pounds and that if there is a time for you to do these movements and get the most benefit from them with the least issue especially as it comes like joints and the other things that by mechanics optimize the time to do that is when you're a teen ager because you have all this stostroand flowing through your body you have if this growth hormone like your joints pretty much heal over night like even if you tweak something that you wake up the next day and you're like oh my god it's magic i'm all better yes aron uh

[aaron_straker]:

remember what i ruptured my achilles

[bryan_boorstein]:

h yeah

[aaron_straker]:

i ship you not i swear to god in the morning i thought it would be fine but i didn't know

[bryan_boorstein]:

right

[aaron_straker]:

that i ruptured it at the time but i was like it's

[bryan_boorstein]:

right

[aaron_straker]:

just like a strain like tomorrow i'll wake up it'll be perfectly fine because that's

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

how a lot of things were back then like i would hurt myself

[bryan_boorstein]:

right

[aaron_straker]:

in the morning i would be okay i literally thought it would be fine the next morning

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

i was wrong

[bryan_boorstein]:

so like that's how we lived right like you would tweak your elbow you would tweak your shoulder like i would remember i did behind the neck barbell presses because that was a big compound movement for the shoulders and i got really strong at it too like i remember in in college doing hunder and eighty five for like sets of eight behind the head and you no it's a wide grip and i would probably go down i wouldn't touch my traps it would be like you know op of the neck or whatever but hundraneightyfive for like six to eight raps in college was fucking savage and i probably can't even do that right now but at that time my body was resilient enough i had the mobility there to be able to do that movement and get a ton of benefit from it and so i just think that even at this point in my career twenty five years in with all the knowledge that we have i think i would struggle to take a novice fifteen year old and and give them a more bio mechanically advantageous program and this is actually something i'm dealing with right now because i have a kid in sweden that i potentially might start working with one on one he contacted me a couple o weeks ago with his mom on d m and h and he wants and he wants to work with me and so we have an initial consult call tomorrow to kind of discuss it and i even in this moment i'm going to hear what he has to say and what his training background is and you know all the different things but if put on the spot right now i still think that my my riding programming philosophy is going to put more importance on the compounds than it would for somebody who's twenty five ten years into their training journey

[aaron_straker]:

i ultimately would agree with that i was kind of not even in my initial argument as opposed to like when i would i said earlier but i wasn't didn't initial me like hears um

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

at that because at that phase of your life like it's hard the intrinsic motivation is different like you just want to get stronger because you want to put more weight on the bar sort of thing as supposed to like don't give a shit about form and stuff like that and like okay yeah they say i'm supposed to worry about form like i just the way to go up you know that was me a hundred percent um and and i would agree i think like if i had someone you know very beginner or very like i'm going to be mostly compound eskstyped it's probably not going to program like a straight up dead lift but we're going to learn how to hip hinge and we'll probably use like a forty five degree hip extension and then the next block transition into like an r d l or something like that

[bryan_boorstein]:

hm

[aaron_straker]:

and just kind of drill the importance of understanding these basic movement mechanics because it how much it translates to everything else you're going to do so yeah that was a really really good point to bring up there

[bryan_boorstein]:

for sure i mean i think there's definitely multiple ways to go about it i don't think it's necessarily wrong i think that whichever way you choose there's the human element of coaching that has to be incorporated in to it and making sure that people kind of understand what they're doing but i think a big one for me that i would change would be tempo or execution in the way that i perform movements so regardless of exercise selection which is something that maybe can become more refined as you go exercise execution and is one that i wish i would have put a lot more emphasis on from like day one um

[aaron_straker]:

ah oh

[bryan_boorstein]:

there just wasn't a lot of information out at the time about tempo and in fact some of the information that was out there at the time that i got started was in what was called super slow training and no one really does this any more but there was a whole sect of people that were really big on this idea of super slow training where time under tension was the thing that mattered and so it would be in eight second negative one second pause and then an eight second concentric so every rap is basically sixteen seventeen eighteen seconds and you would do sets of five to eight which is like a in a half minute set as we know now that's more of like a slow twitch type like high rep set because time under tension being the component that matters so if you're doing five reps at twenty seconds a rep that could be like doing a set of twenty at like a normal tempo at like a five second tempo right like you just reverse them so so i think tempo is important but i don't think taking it to the extreme and doing something super slow as we know now like you never want to do a slow concentric purposefully the slow concentric would be a result of you being tired and trying to move it fast as you can but being incapable of doing so i think that putting a lot more emphasis on the lowering portion of movements would be huge in its ability to control load um and just have more control over all in in your body and what it's doing um not to mention the stretch mediated piece that we now know the eccentric being such a an important part of elongating the muscle let thinking you know a bench press or an artel or squat or any of those big movements as you lower down the muscle is elongating and stretching um versus just trying to move the weight from point to point b which is basically how i lifted for the first eighteen years or so of my maybe even twenty years of my twenty five years yeah i just keep having this flash back to me doing the twenty squat program with buddy in mine i remember one summer i mode lawns and did landscaping like five days a week for nine hours day so that i could save up enough money to buy a power rack and a bar bell and an adjustable dumb bell set and then i had this buddy come over and we would do twenty up squats twice a week in the basement and at the time i remember peeking my twenty squat at a hundred and eighty five pounds for twenty and being like man that was like the hardest thing i've ever done and you know in our cross fit days you know do we start at two seventy five and fucking almost die as we try to work up toward three fifteen but didn't actually quite make it to three fifteen for twenty but at the time like one eighty five for twenty despite you know basically dropping to the ball them and bouncing out and probably doing a half good morning towards the end and stuff like that um it it again taught hard work and and there's just something that so so it's like this disparity cast talks about it a lot where he's like there's not they're not mutually exclusive to say that you're doing biamenmiomechanically correct movement and working hard those are not mutually exclusive you can do by a mechanically correct movement and work hard i just don't know that somebody in their first few years of training can do that there's just something about those big compound movements with the free weights that instill the idea of hard work and just trying to put myself in my shoes at eighteen nineteen years old even three four five as into training i cannot imagine that i would be able to do something as acute and specific as a pull down with the necessary execution and still be able to hard on it like it does seem to me that at that time in my training those two things are mutually exclusive or were mutually exclusive so what do you think about that

[aaron_straker]:

again i agree especially at that time like looking back i mean i was sucking more on like in multi facets of my life but i think the only way you cold got me away from that is to put me in an environment where i am eighteen years old everyone else is like twenty six and an above end you you know you up level because that's the environment you're in you put me in your high school weight room which is where i was at that time your college you're going to get the same out of me there's there's

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

no way i would have been able to

[bryan_boorstein]:

m

[aaron_straker]:

you now perform or have that wherewithal to understand that importance

[bryan_boorstein]:

ah for sure i think a big one for me is is leg training and i just finished talking about you know dead lift and twenty up squats but i certainly went through periods of time in my first five six years of training where i deprioritized legs a ton maybe even the first ten years like off and on so there was like you know that period in my ear days where i was doing twenty ear up squats and doing five by five and then i remember hitting college and being like legs man i want to go out and drink and have fun and legs are hard you know so i remember literally we were on a five day split in college me and anders and uh and legs was of course one of the five days but i remember maybe every other week or every third week i'd just be like a no legs today and i would just train four days that week like it would just literally i would just not do leg day and so that's something that obviously is so blasphemous now to even think of that i wish i could go back and do those leg days because man like legs are just the they're my they're my worst body part and it's because when i was young i just did prioritize them and the things i did prioritize are to this day strong body parts and so i wish that i could go back and train legs harder more often and more variety probably

[aaron_straker]:

you again hit the nail on the head with that one mine was a little bit different an that like my introduction to weight lifting was power lifting for football um

[bryan_boorstein]:

right

[aaron_straker]:

we squatted so much right ember after my senior football year being over vowing to never squat again

[bryan_boorstein]:

uh

[aaron_straker]:

because i hated it so much

[bryan_boorstein]:

h

[aaron_straker]:

and it was so heavy and ruling all the time i was excited when i got to college i was like i'm not funking squatting any more like that those days are behind me and i think for probably the first two years i may be would have done some like leg extensions or something in that it um that's another one just understanding how to train legs like properly is something that i really did not figure out until i was in my you know way well past the cross fit days my power my second phase of power lifting days and even unto like my hypertrophy like i can confidently say it wasn't until s like thirty three years old i really finally understood how to how to produce consistent really quality like sessions um

[bryan_boorstein]:

hm

[aaron_straker]:

that's insane that's after after already training for fifteen years sixteen

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

years

[bryan_boorstein]:

like we didn't have great leg sessions during cross fit because even when we would chain legs it was just a get the weight up as however you need to type thing and so funk man i remember even front squats in wads like i would be turning it into a little bit of a good morning like my low back would always be more taxed than my legs were i would finish front squatting in a wad um and then back squats were obviously the same thing because i i lo bar squad because you could use more weight it just was never a specific acute stimulus to a specific area it was just like hey this is checking the box for legs so we're just going to sit down and stand up and it doesn't really matter because the legs are doing the job type thing but they're not doing the job as well as they could have been

[aaron_straker]:

exactly exactly and it's a it's a common thing it's a different

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

when the goal is hypertrophy the goal the aim

[bryan_boorstein]:

ah

[aaron_straker]:

isn't just check the

[bryan_boorstein]:

h

[aaron_straker]:

box on the rep move the weight sort of thing it's like this is our intention we want to perform it as such because of x m like i have a client who who goes across it like three days per week and then we have them on like cross fit accessories program and i have to be very specific with his intent how i want things performed because it's not just moved the weight it's like we want time under tention we want to pay attention to you know the lengthened pause here because

[bryan_boorstein]:

hm

[aaron_straker]:

of x now that sort of thing

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah much of that i think is managing that like stimulus to fatigue ratio and so it just kind of is representative of why a movement that extends at three joints like back slot or a conventional dead lift just it doesn't drive tension to a specific area where you want it there's not a high stimulus but there is a really high global fatigue cost from that movement and the more specific and acute that you can become in your execution the more you can kind of shift that ratio to be more stimulus and less fatigue which kind of goes to a another point that

[aaron_straker]:

oh

[bryan_boorstein]:

i wanted to make on our training history which is the use of isolation movements because i didn't use many of m and i think that that's okay for the early years but i wish i would have started using them more faster or earlier and the reason i don't think it mate initially is because when we look at now the science of what we have on lengthened overload movements being

[aaron_straker]:

yeah

[bryan_boorstein]:

better than short overload movements when you look at the bulk of the movements that you perform when you're doin free weight compounds they are almost ubiquitously going to be lengthened um you have your your hip hinges you have your squat patterns or your single eggs squats you have your man what were the tryset movements that you would do some sort of skull crusher

[aaron_straker]:

yeah

[bryan_boorstein]:

variation those are

[aaron_straker]:

yeah

[bryan_boorstein]:

very lengthened overloaded

[aaron_straker]:

yeah

[bryan_boorstein]:

a bar bell curl probably mid range overload possibly

[aaron_straker]:

eh

[bryan_boorstein]:

short mid but but like it's

[aaron_straker]:

dips

[bryan_boorstein]:

it's dips lengthened yeah

[aaron_straker]:

i yeah

[bryan_boorstein]:

so like overhead

[aaron_straker]:

a

[bryan_boorstein]:

press lengthened so i mean you really don't have any short overload movements when you're talking about free weight compounds aside from your rowing movement and even when we would do bend over rose for the first fifteen years of my training what did i do well i would stay strict for a little bit and then there would starting to be some momentum which would essentially increase the lengthened overload so i think that almost like makes sense that people would prescribe these big compounds more so than isolations just because in general the compounds tend to be lengthened and the isolations and to be shortened though not always the case but i didn't do things like legecensions leg curls much lateral raises i did some but i mostly overhead pressed for shoulders so the almost the only isolation movement i did at all in the first ten years was arm work and even that like we just discussed was mostly lengthened to overload depending on on which which specific movements are being selected so so in that sense i think it's good that i didn't do these isolations early but i wish i would have started them earlier like during that period of time where we were in cross fit i kind of wish i had begun to implement some more this what's the way of saying this orthopetically beneficial training to train the muscle through full ranges of motion at long and short muscle lengths and things like that like wish i would have had some of that stuff to incorporate during those days instead of just continue to pound the length and only train which is literally what cross fit is almost across the board

[aaron_straker]:

yeah and that's one thing where i kind of transitioning the conversation i know we kind of we touched on it to two episodes go but i definitely wouldn't say that i wish i did do the cross fit phase because that was like a that like re lit a fire in my life for physical exercise and just passion really you know you know

[bryan_boorstein]:

hm

[aaron_straker]:

i said this multiple times without that i would have nothing in my life that i do now um although i do think that many of us kind of were starting to feel some of the same ways a little bit earlier than we kind of departed from it but

[bryan_boorstein]:

m

[aaron_straker]:

just

[bryan_boorstein]:

m

[aaron_straker]:

didn't i weren't comfortable saying like well this i know this is he this is the flavor of the cool aid we can't have this other this other flavored cool aid like we have red or cross it flavored cool aid we need to do the cross fit like i ber the one summer where you said hey we're not going to do any cross it we're just going to get

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

really really strong and we were kind of like oh you know okay we're not doing cross it whatever but then it was so much fucking fun at the end of the summer like hey we got to get back in shape again and remember being like fuck

[bryan_boorstein]:

m

[aaron_straker]:

why

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

i don't i don't i don't want to do this anymore this was a lot of fun this summer but i think like a lot of us felt that kind of way as we just you know just like strength training with our friends in group without

[bryan_boorstein]:

hm

[aaron_straker]:

the like you know getting your dick pushed in cross fit style workouts um but i wish like as that yet i wish i didn't kind of hang on as long because that's what i thought i needed to do

[bryan_boorstein]:

h

[aaron_straker]:

but we

[bryan_boorstein]:

m

[aaron_straker]:

all kind of i felt we're having very similar feelings like in art isolation but we kind of never really talked about him as much

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah yeah i mean i think cross fit came along at the perfect time for me because so in two thousand nine i've been training for twelve years which is kind of crazy i was twenty i was twenty six twenty seven years old and had been training twelve years already and i was starting to just become disillusioned with training i had been doing the same body part split type training five days a week for half a decade at that point since before college basically i was doing a brow split similar movement exercise selection similar rep set up and stuff like that and remember just like having to force myself to go to the gym like i would i would be working my corporate job and i'd be like okay i really want to go at lunch because then i don't have to do it after work so i'd try and sneak in sessions during lunch which really were like forty five minute sessions that were super rushed because i had to get back to work um and then if i ever didn't do it at lunch end of the day would come in half the time i just like you know what i don't really feel like doing this i want to go home and like watch t v with my room mates or something along those lines and so those are those are things that i would never say now like there's no part of me that's like screw training i'll just like sit down and this game instead or something you know because it is such a priority for me now and i think part of that credit probably goes to the fact that i'm in the industry and i have people that depend on me and so there's a bit of accountabil there but i was starting to lose some of that personal accountability before cross fit and then cross it came and like you said the passion and the inspiration and the competitive drive just all all happened and it got us excited about training again and i only lost that passion briefly during the period of time as i was kind of transitioning out of cross fit and i was so beat down with my hormones that it was just difficult for me to be excited about training but what i was excited about was this new transition of this new style of training that jumping out of cross fit and ing into now this evidence based hypertrophy world that didn't exist before cross fit it now exists and so there's all this knowledge and insight and information that i can that i can take in that i couldn't have done before cross fit so it was super cool to look at the dychogomy between where training was as far as like an intellectual pursuit for cross fit and then just seven years later coming out of cross fit and hypertrophy training has a completely intellectual property to it which was so invigorating and so exciting so um maybe the the thing i'm trying to say there is that it's okay for a little bit to kind of chase the shiny object and do the thing that hat you want to do that will invigorate you even if maybe it's not optimal maybe it's what you need number of years in to keep that fire lit so that you can continue to do this for a longer period of time

[aaron_straker]:

yeah and i think again mean everything you're saying i'm just like you're speaking directly to me i mean obviously you're speaking to me but um same thing i was at the end of college i was so over going to jim i was literally only going because it was just something that i thought i had to do but i was miserable like i was so sick of seeing the same people i hated all of my play lists i didn't

[bryan_boorstein]:

uh

[aaron_straker]:

enjoy and i was like i am here

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

going through the motions to check the box and i do not want to be here and that gave me an outlet that i think really carried me through those that years where there's a lot of uncertainty like i'm you know no longer an adolescent in college like i'm now in you know the real world per se but i don't really like the real world and it was like an escape for me i was like this place is this is just how i paid my bills and ship and then at five o'clock like i'm at cross fit with my friends you know and this is like like my job was just a means to get me to be be able to do that but then yeah like you said it's i think we just

[bryan_boorstein]:

oh

[aaron_straker]:

kind of got really lucky with times there and then the kind of influx of like what we have now like you know instagram really led paid paved path to your hobby is body builders and people literally like you and i who probably i mean you've you've obviously competed i will at some point just to kind of check the box but i'm not you know i'm not i'm not going to act i'm excited about it by any stretch of the imagination

[bryan_boorstein]:

ah

[aaron_straker]:

but i just love

[bryan_boorstein]:

ah

[aaron_straker]:

it you know and now we have business is in the in the industry that were very fortunate to have and it's like it's i enjoy it just as much now as i did when i was you know fifteen in the high school wait room you know just competing against people sort of thing and i really feel like because of this timing of when that happened versus when hitting a little bit of that evidence based you know instagramtype movement just lined up perfectly for that for sure

[bryan_boorstein]:

no i totally agree and i'm actually like i thought about this a lot but i'm very thankful for instagram as annoying as it is a lot of times and you know the pressure to pose and put your life on there and stuff like that it has it has provided me a level of accountability that i could not have gotten any other way that i can think of especially like you know posting my daily weights

[aaron_straker]:

at

[bryan_boorstein]:

when i do my mind its and having those discussions with people that i truly ender like i love hearing people's thoughts and having

[aaron_straker]:

he

[bryan_boorstein]:

discussions about things and then just the idea of you know have bees program and there's these people that depend on me and look at my story as um as a way to

[aaron_straker]:

yeah

[bryan_boorstein]:

kind of emulate the way that i'm doing things and that is extremely rewarding for me but also provides an accountability where i feel like i can't let people down and so um training for me isn't an option at this point it's not like in two thousand nine as i'm becoming disillusioned with training before cross fit and i'm like i'll just skip this session here or skip that leg day there or whatever it's like i have to do these sessions because people are depending on me and and i really enjoy that accountability and even that pressure

[aaron_straker]:

yeah the one thing and i made this mental note poorly of course earlier in the episode that you just brought back up and i would say kind of where i would wrap the episode from my kind of standpoint um

[bryan_boorstein]:

m

[aaron_straker]:

one i agree absolutely love instagram right of course there's like a dark side to it but i mean friends all over the world and then i can be

[bryan_boorstein]:

yep

[aaron_straker]:

like hey i'm like literally in ten days or whatever i'm going to go lift weights with dave mcconey who we've been like just kind of instagram friends

[bryan_boorstein]:

wait really

[aaron_straker]:

n m

[bryan_boorstein]:

that's awesome

[aaron_straker]:

yeah yeah because

[bryan_boorstein]:

i

[aaron_straker]:

i'm gonna

[bryan_boorstein]:

know about this that's so

[aaron_straker]:

yeah

[bryan_boorstein]:

cool

[aaron_straker]:

so he was just like he was the first guest on our podcast you know with abel back in don't

[bryan_boorstein]:

episode

[aaron_straker]:

twenty

[bryan_boorstein]:

four

[aaron_straker]:

one

[bryan_boorstein]:

i believe so ud

[aaron_straker]:

episode

[bryan_boorstein]:

have been january

[aaron_straker]:

four

[bryan_boorstein]:

of two thousand twenty

[aaron_straker]:

and we've been like instagram you know friends and then i i can't remember how we found out like he's in philly and i'm like oh i'm going home and i'm a a wedding in philly i'm from pennsylvania and yeah we're gonna go lift wight to the day the wedding so i'm like super pumped about that and like things like that like i can be like

[bryan_boorstein]:

m

[aaron_straker]:

oh hey i'm in you know whatever city like let's lift

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

weights and then this person you've never met who's just like an instagram friend of hell yeah let's lift weights and go like meal like that's the coolest thing until i met jeremiah bear

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah

[aaron_straker]:

it's been absolutely fantastic for that sort of thin so it's really how you use it

[bryan_boorstein]:

what dates are you doing that

[aaron_straker]:

right

[bryan_boorstein]:

with dave

[aaron_straker]:

third if september has a thirty first it's on september

[bryan_boorstein]:

it

[aaron_straker]:

thirty

[bryan_boorstein]:

doesn't

[aaron_straker]:

first okay

[bryan_boorstein]:

it doesn't

[aaron_straker]:

it's october first

[bryan_boorstein]:

okay okay

[aaron_straker]:

um but the last thing i would say is one of the things i would do with the training career as i would definitely have a coach earlier on um some of these things are really and now obviously speaking from my own perspective i am very poor with my own ccalentanability even to this day like i am

[bryan_boorstein]:

oh

[aaron_straker]:

literally a professional at this and my accountability when i do not have my own coach is poor i'm still tracking my food i'm still in my macrosbutkevaluating it having someone to deliver a deliverable to at the end of the week which is where you're going to evaluate your weight averages take progress photo these sorts of things like even if it's like maybe you're young and you can't afford to coach like have an accountability friend where you guys send

[bryan_boorstein]:

oh

[aaron_straker]:

each other like your averages or something like you just want to report to something help keep you accountable like my first coach you know i've talked about before jason theobald hockey stick you know my coaching career just by giving me objective targets and putting me in that coach to client like relationship hierarchy relationship and just he brought out like this massive adherence out of me because i never wanted to submit a ship checking i wanted to impress him and i the spot on for sixteen weeks straight and that's when i first took my physique from like oh wow i'm actually i have a pretty damn good physique i just didn't know anything about fucking dieting and thought

[bryan_boorstein]:

oh

[aaron_straker]:

that i could be two hundred and twenty five pounds under six foot as a natural and abs which

[bryan_boorstein]:

m

[aaron_straker]:

not going no fucking happen

[bryan_boorstein]:

yeah no that's interesting perspective for sure i actually had an additional thought on the nutrition side of all of this but i feel like instead of going into this since we're already or an hour in maybe we can discuss some of the things we would do differently nutritionally just as like a tangent to next episode maybe

[aaron_straker]:

definitely

[bryan_boorstein]:

because i don't think we need a whole episode on it but i think that interesting to touch on

[aaron_straker]:

we can do that for sure

[bryan_boorstein]:

all right cool well let's wrap this up i got to get the kids to school

[aaron_straker]:

all right as always guys thank you for listening brian and i will talk to you next

[bryan_boorstein]:

m

[aaron_straker]:

week

Episode intro/life updates
Tangible versus intangible type work in training and entrepreneurship
Understanding mechanics in anatomy earlier
Paul Carter’s advise back in the day - starting with full body three times a week hit your big compounds
Bryan says now, the biggest change would be tempo or execution
If we could go back in time to train legs harder more often and more variety
More specific in your execution the more you can shift that ratio to be more stimulus and less fatigue
Transitioning out of cross fit, hormones out of whack, it was difficult for to be excited about training
Get a coach as early as you can and create better habits and accountability