Eat Train Prosper

Evidence, Anecdote, & Personal Preference | ETP#75

July 05, 2022 Aaron Straker | Bryan Boorstein
Eat Train Prosper
Evidence, Anecdote, & Personal Preference | ETP#75
Show Notes Chapter Markers

Today’s episode topic is all about how we approach coaching clients, and in what ways we account for these three components: evidence-based, personal preference, and anecdote. Do we tend to use all three equally? Or do we put more credence in one more?

We break this topic into our two main pillars, of course, training and nutrition. And detail our coaching approaches respectively for each.

This episode ends up being a very productive and insightful conversation into the limitations of applying some research, and the power of anecdote and preference when you’re finding yourself at the far ends of the spectrum.

Thanks for listening! 



Coaching with Aaron ⬇️
https://strakernutritionco.com/metabolic-performance-protocol

Done For You Client Check-In System for Online Coaches ⬇️
https://strakernutritionco.com/macronutrient-reporting-check-in-template/

Paragon Training Methods Programming ⬇️
https://paragontrainingmethods.com

Follow Bryan's Evolved Training Systems Programming ⬇️
https://evolvedtrainingsystems.com

Find Us on Social Media  ⬇️
IG | @Eat.Train.Prosper
IG | @bryanboorstein
IG | @aaron_straker
YT | EAT TRAIN PROSPER PODCAST



Episode introduction/life updates
Bryan always starts with anecdote first, working with advanced bodybuilders. He asks: What has worked for you in the past? What hasn’t worked?
Aaron explains variables that impact personal preference: ie: training age, history and stressors.
Diet is often a PREFERENCE of high carb or higher fat that drives the decision process. Different levels of pursuit of optimality dictated by preferences and anecdotes.
Aaron says, it really does depend on the ambition of the client’s goal and they’re proximity to that goal.
Volume is a driver of satiety and protein and high-carb is king for volume. Assuming training for body composition.
You want to start from the baseline of an evidence-based position.
Training experience is important here. The lower the training age, the simpler things generally can be.
The more green you are, the more you can lean on evidence and research